A Savvier Breed of Missionary Student

By Teresa Mendez writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, March 15, 2005 | Go to article overview

A Savvier Breed of Missionary Student


Teresa Mendez writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


It's possible that, by the next presidential election, graduates of America's more than 700 religious colleges will have begun to blur the much-ballyhooed demarcation between red states and blue.

She calls them "the missionary generation." And "God on the Quad" author Naomi Schaefer Riley believes that as these 1.3 million young people move into the secular world, many will gravitate toward big cities in blue states - New York, Boston, Los Angeles - where their influence may exceed their number.

In 2001 and 2002, while researching her book, Ms. Riley visited 20 schools, including the University of Notre Dame (Catholic) in Indiana, Yeshiva University (Jewish) in New York, and Soka University (Buddhist) in California.

She was shocked that of all the people she met, only two tried to convert her.

"You get this idea that if you ... deal with seriously religious communities, they're going to look at you - a nice Jewish girl - as a sitting duck," Riley says over a bagel at the Tatnuck Bookseller here in her hometown.

One student at Brigham Young University in Utah quietly handed her an inscribed copy of the Book of Mormon.

At Bob Jones University, the fundamental Christian school in South Carolina, where Republican presidential nominees, including George W. Bush, have for years stopped to stump, the sell was a bit harder. Still, she says, it was a far cry from "hellfire and brimstone."

This movement, away from overt proselytizing and toward "leading by example," is one of the ways in which the new missionary generation stand apart from their parents. It's a savvy shift that Riley believes will serve them well in secular society.

Back in her hometown to speak at Holy Cross College, where her father is a political science professor, the author was also scheduled to read at the Tatnuck Bookseller later in the week.

At the entrance to Tatnuck Bookseller, housed in a former factory and now the largest independent bookstore in New England, pyramids of books crowd pieces of ancient machinery. "God on the Quad: How Religious Colleges and the Missionary Generation Are Changing America" is stacked off to the left. Riley seems at ease here, in a spot that was once one of her high school haunts.

She says the students she encountered in her reporting were, for the most part, thoughtful and motivated, immersed in a rigorous and demanding education. Their teachers were qualified. And learning and faith were elevated in equal measure.

"There's a common idea that religion waters down the curriculum," says Riley, who admits she herself must have set out with this preconception.

But that's not what she found at schools such as Wheaton College (Christian Evangelical) in Illinois or at California's Roman Catholic Thomas Aquinas College. …

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