In Africa, a New Commitment to Treat AIDS ; but Billions of Dollars Will Be Needed for Tests and Drugs, Posing a Key Challenge to Countries and Donors

By Abraham McLaughlin writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, December 9, 2005 | Go to article overview

In Africa, a New Commitment to Treat AIDS ; but Billions of Dollars Will Be Needed for Tests and Drugs, Posing a Key Challenge to Countries and Donors


Abraham McLaughlin writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


The fight against AIDS in Africa is entering a phase of great promise and peril: the drug-treatment era.

After years of debating how and if Africans diagnosed with HIV/ AIDS should be treated, there's now significant global agreement that the 25 million people in sub-Saharan Africa estimated to have the disease will eventually get anti-AIDS drugs.

Yet, there's also a growing realization that dependence on these drugs will require new spending, including billions of dollars for new tests and treatments. The reason: A patient's first set of AIDS drugs usually loses its effectiveness after four to five years and must be replaced by "second-line" drugs, which are roughly eight times more expensive.

"The era of implementation has started," said Peter Piot, executive director of the UN AIDS agency, at this week's International Conference on AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Infections in Africa, here in Abuja, Nigeria's capital. "The world is now committed to universal treatment."

As recently as two years ago, a debate raged over whether Africans could carry out the complicated treatment process. US aid- agency chief Andrew Natsios famously stated in 2001 that Africans "don't know what Western time is," and wouldn't take pills at appointed hours.

In addition to that concern - heavily criticized and disproven - there was skepticism that AIDS drugs could be widely distributed because of often-inadequate infrastructure and the difficulties of administration in conflict areas. The cost factor was daunting for donors, because the drugs are too costly for most patients.

Meanwhile, the idea of AIDS treatment as a universal right has gained ground. At the Africa-focused G-8 summit in July, leaders of the world's richest nations committed to HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment, and care for as close to everyone as possible by 2010.

Currently, only about 500,000 people with HIV or AIDS across Africa are getting drugs. Two years ago, it was just 75,000. Countries around the continent are boosting efforts to provide free or low-cost treatment.

Nigeria just announced it will provide drugs to 250,000 people by next year, up from an official 30,000 now - out of at least 3.

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