Egyptian Government Steps Up Attacks on Voters ; on the Last Day of Voting, Violence Broke out as Police Barred Voters from Casting Their Ballots

By Dan Murphy writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, December 9, 2005 | Go to article overview

Egyptian Government Steps Up Attacks on Voters ; on the Last Day of Voting, Violence Broke out as Police Barred Voters from Casting Their Ballots


Dan Murphy writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


After the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's most powerful opposition group, tripled its presence in parliament over the first five rounds of Egypt's six-round election, the government appeared to decide it would not take any chances on the last day of voting Wednesday.

Running battles at dozens of polling places were waged between voters desperate to get to the polls and tens of thousands of riot police deployed to deter them.

The dramatic footage - of riot police firing rubber bullets and tear gas, and beating voters, as civilians threw rocks in response - reminded many Egyptians of clashes in the West Bank.

Wednesday's violence appeared to be a message that the government's promises of political reform stop well short of allowing the ruling National Democratic Party's (NDP) grip on parliament to be weakened. But that stance could complicate the US- Egyptian relationship in the coming months.

"In the context of the past two years, particularly, the promises the NDP put forward about opening up, this has been a disastrous election,'' says Gasser Abdel-Razek, who coordinated poll monitoring for the Egyptian Organization for Human Rights. "The level of violence was about the same as the 2000 election, but it's not a fair comparison given the promises [President Hosni] Mubarak made, the expectations that were raised."

Eight people were killed in Wednesday's clashes, raising the toll for the entire election to 10, the same number killed in the 2000 election. Hundreds more were wounded and over 1,000 arrested.

When US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice visited Egypt earlier this year, she praised President Mubarak's commitment to democracy.

But the violence and other indications of fraud at the polls prompted the United States to express concern and dismay. On Wednesday, her spokesman Adam Ereli said recent events here "raise serious concerns about the path of political reform in Egypt."

He said clashes with voters, the arrest of opposition candidates, and police abuse of journalists and election monitors "send the wrong signal about Egypt's commitment to democracy and freedom, and we see them as inconsistent with the Government of Egypt's professed commitment to increased political openness. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Egyptian Government Steps Up Attacks on Voters ; on the Last Day of Voting, Violence Broke out as Police Barred Voters from Casting Their Ballots
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.