Warning Flags Flutter on Economy

By Francis, David R. | The Christian Science Monitor, April 24, 2006 | Go to article overview

Warning Flags Flutter on Economy


Francis, David R., The Christian Science Monitor


Economists are reluctant to forecast recessions, especially since they have become less frequent in recent years. It is professionally damaging to wrongly predict such a slump.

Economists are less reluctant to warn of trouble ahead, such as a housing bubble bursting, trillions of dollars in loan-related financial packages coming unglued, or the dollar plunging as huge United States trade deficits continue.

In general, economists do modestly better at predicting the economy than simple mathematical projections of past economic trends do. But economists often get into trouble when they try to foretell financial downturns.

Perhaps that's why most economists are cheery about the health of the US economy.

Economists and policymakers at the US Federal Reserve also have a history of upbeat forecasting. They didn't see the last recession in 2000 and 2001 until about nine months after it started.

That's typical, because the Fed and other economists rely on financial data collected with a lag of a month or more.

"It is like driving down the road with your eyes glued to the rearview mirror," says Harald Malmgren, a Washington consulting economist. "When a bend in the road comes, this navigational technique is unreliable."

Many stock-market investors are aware of this risk. Late last month, the Fed raised short-term interest rates one-quarter of 1 percent for the 15th time since June 2004, to 4.75 percent. With long-term interest rates also rising, many investors wonder if the Fed will overdo monetary tightness again, causing an economic downturn.

So when minutes of the last meeting of Fed policymakers hinted they might end their anti-inflation drive and not boost interest rates next month, stock prices rose dramatically last week.

"If the Fed doesn't stop raising rates soon, the recession flag could go up," warns Paul Kasriel, an economist at the Northern Trust Co., a Chicago bank.

Yet he, like many other economists, sees problems for the economy. "We have a very accident-prone global economy right now," Mr. Kasriel says.

Among the perils he and others see:

Risky mortgages, riskier derivatives

The Fed is concerned over the rapid expansion of nontraditional mortgages, such as interest-only loans and those where the size of the loan grows, rather than shrinks. The Fed and other US financial regulators have produced a draft "supervisory guidance" for participants in the US mortgage market. A final version of this guidance, when it emerges, could constrain the home-mortgage market later this year, Mr. Malmgren warns. Similarly, regulators are trying to tame the market for risky loans linked to commercial real estate.

In the international sphere, the Fed and banking regulators in Britain and other nations worry about the rapid expansion in recent years of high-risk "credit derivatives," now in the trillions of dollars. …

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