E. Coli Cases Prompt Calls to Regulate Farm Practices ; Even as Investigators Track the Source of Tainted Spinach, Consumer Groups Seek More FDA Authority over Farms

By Daniel B. Wood writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, September 18, 2006 | Go to article overview

E. Coli Cases Prompt Calls to Regulate Farm Practices ; Even as Investigators Track the Source of Tainted Spinach, Consumer Groups Seek More FDA Authority over Farms


Daniel B. Wood writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


The quest continued over the weekend to pinpoint the source of E. coli bacteria that has tainted fresh or packaged spinach, even as some consumer groups called for greater federal authority to regulate farming practices.

Over the weekend, federal health officials expanded their initial Sept. 13 warning not to eat bagged spinach to include any fresh, raw spinach. As of late Saturday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported 102 cases of E. coli exposure in 19 states since Aug. 2, including one death in Wisconsin.

In looking hard at America's regulation of food handling from farms to dinner tables, the process generally gets high marks - and has been improved in recent years to reduce the risk of bioterrorism, experts say. But this latest incident, taken with earlier reports of E. coli contamination in greens, exposes a glaring weakness, they add: effective health standards and cleanliness enforcement on the farm itself.

Consumer watchdogs hope the more-frequent appearance of E. coli in leafy vegetables will finally cause Congress to expand the reach of the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) to farms.

"We think this incident shows the FDA is suffering from the same weak-kneed approach that they had before they were given more power to regulate beef in the 1990s" after several outbreaks of E. coli were linked to ground beef, says Caroline Smith DeWaal, director of food safety for the Center for Science in the Public Interest. "No one is really in charge of food safety on the farm, and the FDA has come in with fairly weak guidelines there that they can only suggest but not enforce. They need direction from Congress to address standards on the farm."

Scientists say E. coli bacteria live in the intestines of cattle and other animals and are passed to plants through contact with fecal matter. Produce could become contaminated several ways: manure used for fertilizer, fecal runoff into streams that are used for farm irrigation, or even droppings from birds that had swallowed manure. As a result, stricter FDA oversight is needed at sites where produce is grown, many observers say. …

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