Latest Antiporn Target: Hotel-Room TV ; A Campaign Urges Prosecution of Hotels under Obscenity Laws - and Directs People to Smut-Free Lodging

By Matt BradleyCorrespondent of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, September 6, 2006 | Go to article overview

Latest Antiporn Target: Hotel-Room TV ; A Campaign Urges Prosecution of Hotels under Obscenity Laws - and Directs People to Smut-Free Lodging


Matt BradleyCorrespondent of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


It's a business that has become quietly entrenched in America's corporate culture: pay-per-view pornography in hotel rooms. Most large chains provide the service, along with standard-issue films.

The pay-per-view service has brought hotels millions of dollars a year. But these days, the US hotel business is also attracting moral outrage and vitriol - on a scale that pornography insiders say amounts to one of the largest organized assaults on the skin business in recent memory.

A consortium of 13 conservative groups has created CleanHotels.com, a website that provides listings and reservation services for US hotels where travelers can rest safe from taint or temptation. The conservative groups have also run a series of full- page ads in USA Today, urging authorities to prosecute hoteliers under federal and local obscenity statutes.

Currently, the listings on CleanHotels.com number between 13,000 and 15,000 - mostly including small chains, with a notable one being Omni Hotels. Many in the pornography industry contend the effort won't have much effect on their business, but those on the other side are equally adamant they can make a difference.

"We wanted to provide an alternative," says Phil Burress, president of Citizens for Community Values, an Ohio-based "pro- family" organization that is part of the consortium. "Not only were we disgusted with the fact that major hotels that present themselves as being family-friendly were offering hard-core pornography ... we wanted to point out the fact that there are thousands and thousands of hotels that do not offer in-room pornography."

The strategy, Mr. Burress says, is to expose hotels that offer pay-per-view porn and let the market take care of the rest.

But such an approach might not be effective, says Paul Cambria, general counsel for the Adult Freedom Foundation in Los Angeles. "The hotels understand that that's just part of the package that they offer their guests.... I don't think they will be intimidated." He adds, "Most responsible prosecutors are realizing that this is a waste of time and money to prosecute this."

While the financial extent of hotel porn is hard to estimate - hotels keep statistics to themselves or don't keep them at all - the adult pay-per-view and video-on-demand businesses, both in hotels and private residences, will bring in an estimated $1.6 billion in 2006. In 1996, that number was $593 million, according to California- based Kagan Research.

When it comes to accessing adult pay-per-view in hotel rooms, the system has safety checks. Parents can block viewing by either clicking a remote-control code or calling the front desk. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Latest Antiporn Target: Hotel-Room TV ; A Campaign Urges Prosecution of Hotels under Obscenity Laws - and Directs People to Smut-Free Lodging
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.