Canadians Go West in Black-Gold Rush ; an Exodus of Job-Seekers Heading to Alberta's 'Oil Patch' Forces Eastern Canada to Import Workers

By Colin Woodard Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, December 15, 2006 | Go to article overview

Canadians Go West in Black-Gold Rush ; an Exodus of Job-Seekers Heading to Alberta's 'Oil Patch' Forces Eastern Canada to Import Workers


Colin Woodard Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Near the foot of this hamlet's red-and-white lighthouse, fishing crews have unloaded their catches regularly ever since the first French settlers dropped anchor here three centuries ago.

Processing the catch has been central to life here from the days when families salted cod on the beaches to when they punched in for work at the large seafood-processing plant above the harbor.

But this year was different at the local seafood plant, one of the world's largest lobster-processing facilities. In a town and province renowned for fishing, the company - Ocean Choice - couldn't find enough workers, and was forced to fly in 39 guest workers from Russia to man the lines.

"We try to recruit locally, but without results," says Jon Osmann, the plant's Icelandic operations director. There are so few workers in Prince Edward Island these days that he expects to need twice as many Russians when processing resumes this spring.

From the forests of New Brunswick to the outports of Newfoundland, rural communities are emptying out as residents head west to find steadier work and higher pay in the oil fields of northern Alberta. Tens of thousands have left Atlantic Canada in recent years, leaving behind an increasingly dire labor shortage that threatens to further undermine the region's moribund economy.

"The movement to the west is significant, and there is every indication that it is going to continue for some time," says Greg Byrne, New Brunswick's minister for business, who estimates the four Atlantic provinces are losing a thousand people a month. "Oil patch companies are very aggressively recruiting our region's young people."

Canada oil reserves top 175 billion barrels

Northern Alberta's "oil patch" is booming. For decades, energy companies have known the region's forests cover one of the largest petroleum deposits in the world, with reserves in excess of 175 billion barrels, second only to those in Saudi Arabia. But most of the oil is bound up in black sand and was considered, until recently, too expensive to be worth extracting.

Since oil prices passed $35 a barrel in 2003, however, energy companies have been doing everything they can to increase production. The main limitation is getting enough people to dig, move, and process the oily sands in Alberta's frigid, sparsely settled north. Despite offering some of the highest salaries in North America, the region needs as many as 100,000 more people to man the sand mines and the frontier towns that support them.

With their own fishing, timber, and tourism industries in decline, Atlantic Canadians have been responding to the call in huge numbers. As a result, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Newfoundland's populations are all shrinking, while Alberta's is growing at 3 percent a year, according to Statistics Canada.

Leaving Atlantic Canada behind?

About 11,000 Newfoundlanders now live in the main oil-patch town, Fort McMurray - the largest concentration outside of St.

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