India's Latest Move to Stop Child Labor ; A New Law Banning Children under 14 from Working in Homes or Restaurants Begins Tuesday in India

By Anuj Chopra Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, October 1, 2006 | Go to article overview

India's Latest Move to Stop Child Labor ; A New Law Banning Children under 14 from Working in Homes or Restaurants Begins Tuesday in India


Anuj Chopra Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


On a rainy night, hiding behind a pushcart food stall parked in front of a dizzyingly lit mall, Raju is busy at work. This timid 10- year-old works 12-hour days serving customers and scrubbing mountains of utensils with tiny hands that appear callused by detergent.

After a full day, he often pockets less than a dollar. If there's food left over, he gets a meal. If not, he goes home on an empty stomach.

Concerned about the future of children like Raju, India Tuesday begins implementing a country-wide ban on children below 14 working as domestic help or in the hospitality sector. And punishment for those who choose to defy it is stringent: imprisonment for up to two years and a fine as high as $430.

Children in India are already banned from working in factories, mines, and other perilous jobs. India's Child Labor Act, first passed in 1986, will now carry two more in a list of 57 professions deemed "hazardous" for children.

Child rights activists in India say it's an important step in the battle to stop child labor. But some worry that the government is still not doing enough to provide alternative options for families that depend on income from their children. And many are skeptical about how effective enforcement of the ban will be.

"It is important to remember that the problem won't disappear by just introducing a ban," says Shireen Miller, head of policy at the India branch of the US-based Save the Children organization. "Legislation is a start," she says pointing out that previous legislation hasn't been stringently enforced.

"Now there's a clear signal that [no one] can get away with employing and exploiting children as workers," says Shantha Sinha, an anti-child labor activist who in 2003 won the prestigious Ramon Magsaysay Award. Ms. Sinha recalls how all 34 cases of domestic child labor that she took up last year - most of them of children brutally beaten by their employers - couldn't stand up in court. All of the accused wriggled out of blame, she says, as employing children as domestic help wasn't then prohibited by law. She hopes this ban will reverse such tendencies.

India has the largest number of child laborers on the planet. And studies by non-governmental organizations (NGOs) reveal shockingly high levels of emotional, physical, and sexual abuse among children working as domestic helpers.

According to the New Delhi-based, National Sample Survey Organisation, nearly 16.4 million Indian children aged 5-14 years are engaged in economic activities and domestic or non-remunerative work. The World Bank puts that figure at 44 million. …

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