New Genre of Literature Hits Bookstores - the 'Conditional Confession'

By Kosa, Frank | The Christian Science Monitor, December 14, 2007 | Go to article overview

New Genre of Literature Hits Bookstores - the 'Conditional Confession'


Kosa, Frank, The Christian Science Monitor


O.J. Simpson's "If I Did It" was one of this fall's guilty pleasures - no one admits to reading it, but 150,000 copies have been sold online and in bookstores.

For those who might have forgotten, the ghost-written account of how the former football star would have murdered Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman was supposed to be published last year by ReganBooks, but was pulled in response to public outrage. Later, the Goldman family, awarded the rights to the book by a federal bankruptcy judge, had it printed by a smaller publishing house, Beaufort Books. They retitled it "If I Did it: Confessions of the Killer."

Spurred by the prodigious sales, the American publishing industry is now seeking to capitalize on what many see as a new genre of literature - the Conditional Confession, known as "Con-Con," or "Double-Con."

Other participants in the so-called trial of the century are reported to be rushing their own double-con forays into print. New Reich Books, an imprint of David Duke Publishers, will issue Mark Furhman's "If I Said It," which promises chapters on hurling epithets, glove identification, and popular hikes in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho.

Exculpatory Press will launch Marcia Clark's "If I Smiled." But, tragically, no publishing house so far seems interested in Judge Ito's "If I Ruled It," although his jello mold continues to do well.

This, of course, is only the beginning. Historians are rushing long-moldering manuscripts to agents everywhere. Getting them published can be ... well, murder. But here's what may be hitting the shelves before the new year.

An usher at London's Globe Theatre found a dog-eared folio stuffed into a medieval seat cushion bearing the slogan, "Crushhe Manchester Unitede." The folio was signed "W. Shakespeare" and called, "As a Matter of Fact, I Did Write It.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

New Genre of Literature Hits Bookstores - the 'Conditional Confession'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.