To Promote an Upturn in the Global Economy

The Christian Science Monitor, May 3, 2008 | Go to article overview

To Promote an Upturn in the Global Economy


Last month, asahi.com, an online Japanese/English newspaper, posted an editorial titled "Economic pessimism." It began with the old saying, "Worry is often the cause of illness," and added, "The perceived weakening of the economy, too, may have its beginnings in the mind" (April 3). The editorial went on to discuss the importance of reversing feelings of despair and confusion that could have a deleterious impact on the Japanese economy.

It's a keen observation that thought has a direct impact on individual experience and that it can influence collective experience, too. But it's also important to realize that this mental influence doesn't have to be negative. In fact, the individual conviction that divine Principle governs all can have a collective, positive effect on the world economy.

This is not to say there still aren't issues to work out. The global financial scene may seem somewhat more settled in recent weeks than it has been, but how many would assert that the reasons for instability in the financial markets have been fully addressed? The continued slowdown in the US economy and elsewhere is a sobering reminder that we can't afford to be passive.

Nor can we afford to be fearful. Instead, inspired spiritual activism, based on the idea that the economy is amenable to positive mental influences, will benefit the marketplace. This involves looking beyond material measurements and statistical data, and amplifying all that's good, through deep gratitude for divinity's present, beneficial control of creation.

Mary Baker Eddy used strong words when she told readers of her book "Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures" how to respond to any error of thought: "When the illusion of sickness or sin tempts you, cling steadfastly to God and His idea.... Let neither fear nor doubt overshadow your clear sense and calm trust, that the recognition of life harmonious - as Life eternally is - can destroy any painful sense of, or belief in, that which Life is not" (p. 495).

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