NCAA Plans Vote on Gender Equity Member Schools to Decide Guidelines' Fate

By Ap | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), August 7, 1993 | Go to article overview
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NCAA Plans Vote on Gender Equity Member Schools to Decide Guidelines' Fate


Ap, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


The National Collegiate Athletic Association won't adopt an all-encompassing set of gender-equity rules, NCAA President Joseph Crowley said Friday.

"It's a fact of life, given all the differences among NCAA institutions, that ultimately it will have to be up to each institution to address these issues," Crowley said at the end of the NCAA Council's summer meetings.

Instead, the council will put a set of four gender-equity guidelines to a vote of member schools at the organization's January convention.

The guidelines, a setback for advocates of a 50-50 split of athletic resources, were forwarded Wednesday by a task force that spent more than a year studying the subject.

During a week-long meeting in Beaver Creek, Colo., the council also agreed to sponsor proposals allowing undergraduates to enter the National Basketball Association draft without losing their eligibility, and approving most of the principles of cost containment that the NCAA Presidents Commission has voted to support.

The Pro Sports Liaison Committee had recommended the council write legislation allowing both football and basketball players to try the pro draft without losing their eligibility. Under the proposal for January's agenda, basketball players could enter the draft one time during their undergraduate years and reclaim their eligibility within 30 days, as long as they do not sign a contract. An undergraduate entering the NBA draft a second time would forfeit his eligibility. There was no proposal regarding football.

The council also will sponsor legislation recommended by the task force regarding emerging women's sports.

It declined to sponsor legislation to raise the limit on financial aid in women's sports while keeping present limits on men's, Crowley said.

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NCAA Plans Vote on Gender Equity Member Schools to Decide Guidelines' Fate
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