It Happened Here

St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), December 29, 1993 | Go to article overview

It Happened Here


Energy Secretary Hazel R. O'Leary, prodded by recent articles in the Albuquerque Tribune reporting that America's nuclear laboratories and medical institutions had injected medical patients with radioactive substances to see how they would react, has vowed to review and release information on more than 800 experiments done since 1945. She says the effort meets "an obligation to put the public's mind at rest and expose things that need exposing."

The tests certainly need exposing, but the public's mind is unlikely to be put at rest. Instead, the information that has been released so far is nothing less than shocking and outrageous. Though less was known four decades ago about radiation, its dangers were sufficiently understood to make the experiments reckless.

Worried at the prospect of nuclear war, government laboratories and medical institutions felt they needed to know how soldiers and civilians would react to exposure to radiation. And trace exposure was then considered so inconsequential that even shoe stores used X-ray devices to gauge customers' shoe sizes.

Still, those selected for injection with various kinds of radioactive substances, along with what they weren't told about the nature of the experiments, suggest dubious ethics on the part of the testers. Of course, fully informing subjects about the risks of experiments was less common decades ago than today, no matter what the experiment.

Nevertheless, to irradiate the testicles of prisoners in Oregon and Washington prisons or give radiation-dosed milk to mentally retarded boys at a school in Massachusetts was to prey on the weak and the captive. Nor were follow-ups done to determine whether the subjects were harmed. Worse was injecting seven newborns with radioactive iodine in a Tennessee hospital or giving radioactive iron to 800 pregnant women at Vanderbilt University. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

It Happened Here
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.