Stop Bailing out Disaster Victims

By Chambers, Jack | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), February 2, 1994 | Go to article overview

Stop Bailing out Disaster Victims


Chambers, Jack, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Richard Krimm, an associate director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), recently held a press conference to describe plans for aiding southern California's c earthquake victims. He detailed FEMA's relief efforts, and he conveyed an attitude of cooperation toward state and local agencies. But he seemed perplexed that California officials had turned down FEMA's offer of tents for citizens left homeless by the quake.

I submit that we should all start "turning down the tents." Let's stop depending on the federal government to bail us out of every problem. Victims who are not adequately covered by private insurance should be taken care of through private charity. And, if government is going to be involved, it should be on a local or state level.

Under the Federal Response Plan, 26 government agencies swing into action whenever there is a major catastrophe. Billions of dollars of American taxpayers' hard-earned dollars are redistributed by way of Washington for disaster relief.

FEMA initially estimated it would spend $500 million on this earthquake, almost half the current balance in the Disaster Relief Fund. The Clinton administration committed another $240 million from other agencies. And now the president is requesting billions more from Congress.

Such expenses may seem justified, because most Americans feel compassion when we hear of the plight of fellow citizens who have survived a disaster. But those who want to centralize power take full advantage of this yearning to help. Bureaucrats use it to push through more and more tax appropriations for more and more relief programs.

But we need to put a stop to this. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Stop Bailing out Disaster Victims
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.