Networks Plan Programs Examining Violence

By Lynn Elber Of the | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), February 7, 1994 | Go to article overview

Networks Plan Programs Examining Violence


Lynn Elber Of the, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


MORE VIOLENCE is coming to television. But the networks say they're trying to examine the issue, not exploit it.

In news specials, movies, series - both dramas and comedies - and public service messages, TV networks are holding a crime-battered America up to the light.

Cynics call it an obvious attempt to blunt criticism of television's own violent instincts and to derail efforts to legislate TV gore. Others say the networks are only adding to the emotional overload felt by many.

But executives at a recent gathering of the Television Critics Association said the programs are justified and their motives pure.

"I think violence is such an overwhelmingly important topic and issue facing America that I don't think we come anywhere close to having done enough," said CBS News President Eric Ober.

"We at Fox Broadcasting are trying to be part of the solution to the problem," said its chairman, Lucie Salhany. "We're not going to simply avoid dealing with violent issues, as some critics propose. I believe we have to deal with problems in order to solve them."

Ober announced a three-hour "CBS Reports" news special on violence, a documentary by film makers Paul and Holly Fine that is scheduled to air later this year.

The prime-time special is not intended simply to rehash the alarming rise in crime, he said; the goal is to examine the impact on individuals and find answers.

"Reporting on violence is half the story," Ober said. "I think that looking for solutions to it is the story that will help culturally."

On the series side, the CBS drama "Picket Fences" offered a recent episode that showed how the easy availability of firearms can have a tragic impact on children.

CBS also is planning a prime-time airing of "Kids Killing Kids," a new one-hour show initially commissioned as a daytime "CBS Schoolbreak Special."

"Kids Killing Kids" will offer a series of vignettes of children in trouble, such as a suicidal teen-ager or a youth who wants a weapon because of gang harassment.

The program will offer two resolutions of each problem, one involving violence and the other a nonviolent alternative. A broadcast date was not announced.

Salhany said Fox will join with CBS in airing the program in a rare network teaming. The networks also are sponsoring formation of a national coalition against violence, linking broadcasters with community groups, she said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Networks Plan Programs Examining Violence
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.