St. Louis Film Festival `a Real Step Forward'

By Harper Barnes Post-Dispatch Critic | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), April 21, 1994 | Go to article overview

St. Louis Film Festival `a Real Step Forward'


Harper Barnes Post-Dispatch Critic, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


The third annual St. Louis Film Festival opens tomorrow and continues through Sunday, May 1.

This year's festival will present 36 movies, as compared to 29 last year and two dozen the year before. Movies will be shown at three theaters instead of one. But the major advance this year is that at least 10 filmmakers will visit St. Louis and talk about their work.

Only one or two film makers appeared at the first two festivals, and there were no organized discussions. No awards were given.

This year, director Joseph H. Lewis, who reached his 87th birthday on April 7, will receive the first annual Distinguished Hollywood Film Artist Award from the festival. Lewis will appear at the screening next Thursday of his 1950 B-movie classic "Gun Crazy."

Lewis is familiar to St. Louis film buffs from his popular appearances at the Webster University Film Series. He is highly respected for the astonishingly innovative visual and narrative techniques he brought to very low-budget crime movies, designed to be "second features" to fill out the bottom half of double bills.

Also, the directors of four of the movies on the schedule - "Suture," "blessing," "Where the Rivers Flow North" and "The Fire This Time" - will appear on Sunday at a panel discussion on American independent film production. It's co-sponsored by the St. Louis Film Office. (See the festival schedule for details on this and other appearances by film makers.)

Barbara Jones, director of the festival, said, "I think it is a real step forward, getting so many directors in. This year, we have three `sidebars' focusing on particular areas of filmmaking: Young Americans, African-Americans and the New German Cinema."

Seven films are included in the Young Americans sidebar and two in the African-American sidebar. The New German Cinema sidebar, cosponsored by the Goethe Institute of St. Louis, will present four films.

About half the festival movies had their premieres in January at the Sundance Film Festival in Utah. "I thought young American directors made a particularly strong showing this year at Sundance," Jones said. "And the movies we have picked up range from the avant garde, like `Suture,' to fairly traditional works like `Where the Rivers Flow North.' "

For the first time, the two rival distributors that dominate commercial movie-going in St. Louis - AMC and Wehrenberg - will share the festival. The festival will run for six days at AMC's Esquire Theatres, 6706 Clayton Rd., Richmond Heights. Then it will spend four days at Wehrenberg's Shady Oak, 7630 Forsyth Blvd., Clayton.

The two movies in the African-American sidebar and "Freaked," part of the Young Americans sidebar, will be shown at the independent Tivoli Theatre, 6350 Delmar Blvd., University City.

The purposes of the festival, as before, are to bring in films that wouldn't ordinarily come to St. Louis and to highlight films that might get lost in the shuffle of major releases. Over the last two years, only about a third of the films from the festival returned to St. Louis for regular runs.

Some of this year's festival entries can be counted on to return. That includes the opening-night feature "Widow's Peak," starring Joan Plowright, Mia Farrow and Natasha Richardson; foreign-language Oscar winner "Belle Epoque" and "Backbeat," about the early Beatles. Most festival films probably won't be back.

"We want to make the festival an event for the city, a special time," said Jones.

Tickets are $5.50. Advance tickets can be bought between noon and 6 p.m. today at the Esquire and the Shady Oak. For further information, call 726-6779.

FESTIVAL SCHEDULE

ESQUIRE, APRIL 22-27

(except as noted)

FRIDAY, APRIL 22

7 p.m. - "Widow's Peak": In a small Irish town where widows rule, new arrival Natasha Richardson sparks trouble by taking an interest in the local dentist. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

St. Louis Film Festival `a Real Step Forward'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.