Carlyle Users Calling for Ramp Repairs

By Renken, Tim | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), May 22, 1994 | Go to article overview

Carlyle Users Calling for Ramp Repairs


Renken, Tim, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Every year about this time Carlyle Lake effectively is closed to boaters because high water covers the launch ramps.

Most local anglers seem to think the situation is unavoidable. Excess rainfall, after all, is an act of God.

Nonsense, say other lake users. God may cause the rain, they say, but He didn't decree that the launch ramps had to go out of action because of it. The Corps built those ramps wrong and the Corps can fix them so that people can get on the lake in the spring - the very best time to be there.

"It's just not fair," said Kay Durbin, whose McDonald's restaurant at Carlyle draws much of its trade from people who use the West Access, the lake's busiest. "Every time the lake goes over those launch ramps, people can't get on the lake and all the businesses around it who depend on recreation are hurt.

"`Losing those days is really important because the season is effectively just three months, and we can't afford to lose any of it unnecessarily. Something needs to be done."

When spring rains raised the lake above 450 (elevation above sea level) late last month "Ramps Closed" signs went up at the entrance to the ramps at Boulder, Allen Branch, Coles Creek, South Shore and Dam West. As the level hovered around 453, the only ramps open were the one at Keyesport, on the far northern end of the main lake basin, and a single lane at South Shore.

"If the lake rises to 454, we have to close the one at Keyesport, said Dick Conner, the Corps' assistant project manager. …

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