Mourners Gather at Mrs. Onassis' Home

By Compiled From News Services | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), May 22, 1994 | Go to article overview

Mourners Gather at Mrs. Onassis' Home


Compiled From News Services, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Flowers kept coming. Mourners grew in numbers. And members of the Kennedy clan gathered again to say goodbye Saturday to Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.

Mrs. Onassis' body remained in her 15-room Fifth Avenue apartment, where she died of cancer Thursday night "surrounded by her friends and her family and her books," said her son, John F. Kennedy Jr. Her impromptu wake continued with guests coming to her home for a last visit.

Mrs. Onassis, 64, faded quickly after doctors said her lymph cancer was untreatable. She returned home from the hospital Wednesday and died a day later.

On Saturday, her granddaughters - 5-year-old Rose and 4-year-old Tatiana - arrived outside her apartment house in matching red coats. Caroline and her husband, Edwin Schlossberg, brought the girls inside the building and past a media horde. Dozens of bouquets - pink roses and carnations, red roses - were piled outside its entrance.

At Grand Central Terminal, which Mrs. Onassis is credited with saving from the wrecking ball, the atmosphere was solemn and churchlike as people from around the world paid homage to her.

In the glittering, newly restored south hall, people stopped to sign two large memorial books. …

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