Festival Torch Lighted Ceremony Starts Trek to St. Louis

By Tom Wheatley Of the Post-Dispatch | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), May 22, 1994 | Go to article overview

Festival Torch Lighted Ceremony Starts Trek to St. Louis


Tom Wheatley Of the Post-Dispatch, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


The torch is lit and the relay is under way.

The 1994 U.S. Olympic Festival got off to an emotional start Saturday morning, 14,100 feet above sea level, with a mountainous view that inspired the lyrics to "God Bless America."

Olympic medalists Ray Armstead of St. Louis and Nikki Ziegelmeyer of Imperial lit the Festival torch in a ceremony atop Pike's Peak.

The Festival rite mirrors the Olympic torch-lighting ceremony every four years on Mount Olympus.

Members of the U.S. Olympic Committee in Colorado Springs joined a 200-person contingent of Festival staffers, politicians and corporate patrons at the Olympic Monument atop Pike's Peak.

"Take the torch and run with it, St. Louis," said USOC director of national events Sheila Walker.

The Pike's Peak Running Club got first crack at it, relaying the flame down the mountain on a 20-mile jaunt to the U.S. Olympic Training Center across town in Colorado Springs.

After another brief ceremony, the flame was transferred to two safety lanterns - one is a backup - and flown to Kansas City.

From there on Wednesday, volunteer runners will start to carry the torch across Missouri and Southern Illinois. The finish line will be at the Arch at 8 p.m. July 1, during the Festival's opening ceremony.

During the Festival, nearly 4,000 U.S. athletes will compete in 37 events at 25 sites, or venues.

St. Louis already has set a Festival record with more than $2 million in advance ticket sales.

After the torch was lit, Festival officials and backers were even giddier. And not just because of the normal lightheadedness from oxygen debt at high altitude.

"That felt good, lighting that torch," said Armstead, a gold medalist in the 1,600-meter relay in 1984 and a director of the Torch Relay. "That made my heart beat faster."

"It was a once-in-a-lifetime experience," said East St. Louis Mayor Gordon Bush, who got a hand on the torch before it made its descent from the monument. "I feel that this Festival, from what I saw up here, is going to be the best ever."

And St. Charles County Executive Gene Schwendemann said: "I'm glad I could be a part of it. It's impressive. The Festival is going to be interesting all the way through."

St. Louis Mayor Freeman Bosley Jr. and St. Louis County Executive Buzz Westfall, gung-ho Festival backers, were no-shows because of other commitments.

Bosley was the subject of a perceived snub by the former Festival leadership in St. Louis, which bypassed him on the stage in San Antonio when the torch was transferred to end the 1993 Festival there.

Under the new Festival leadership of chairman Duane Christensen and executive director Mike Dyer, this torch lighting created no sparks.

"The closer you get to the Festival, the more you're drawn into it," said Christensen. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Festival Torch Lighted Ceremony Starts Trek to St. Louis
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.