Homosexuality in the Schools an Egregious Use of Tax Dollars

By Bob Smith Scripps Howard News Service | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), August 19, 1994 | Go to article overview

Homosexuality in the Schools an Egregious Use of Tax Dollars


Bob Smith Scripps Howard News Service, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Earlier this summer, several parents stopped by to see me at the Capitol. They brought with them examples of printed materials being used in some of the nation's elementary and secondary public schools to advocate homosexuality as a positive lifestyle alternative.

Federal funds, they reported, support the use of those publications as instructional materials in the schools.

As we talked, I looked at the materials.

Two books, "Daddy's Roommate" and "Heather Has Two Mommies," are designed to promote homosexuality and same-sex parenting to 3- to 8-year-olds. An illustration in "A Kid's First Playbook About Sex," aimed at the same age group, depicts a child daydreaming and asks him to "write down some daydreams about a person or some people you may want to have sex with when you grow up." This is a book for 3-year-olds!

Other pamphlets, such as "Young, Gay, and Proud" and "1 in 10," are aimed at teen-age schoolchildren. The most explicit pictures and language were contained in the "Safer Sex Handbook for Lesbians" and "Listen Up" by the Gay Men's Health Crisis; these are more like homosexual sex manuals for teen-agers than educational materials.

The language in these pamphlets describes acts of sex not found in most medical textbooks; and much of it is too graphic and obscene to describe in a family newspaper.

On March 18, 1994, The Washington Times ran a story headlined, "New York City AIDS Forum Leaves Parents Horrified." The article states:

"The New York City Youth AIDS conference that impressed AIDS Czar Kristine Gebbie outraged parents with distribution of fliers on anal sex and other homosexual practices to children as young as 12. The Feb. 12 conference at New York University Medical Center was sponsored by the New York Department of Education."

Mary Cummins, a school board member from that district, said she examined the materials and was horrified.

As a former public school teacher and school board chairman, and as a parent of three children, I was shocked that such publications would be distributed to our children.

This egregious use of tax dollars prompted me to offer an amendment to the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, prohibiting federal funds to any local educational agency that implements a "program or activity" that promotes or advocates homosexuality as a positive lifestyle.

When I offered my amendment, I invited my Senate colleagues to stop by my desk to review the materials because I could not show the publications' obscene illustrations, or quote their lewd language, during nationally televised Senate proceedings. …

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