U.S. Switch Has Cuban Exiles Feeling Betrayed `Dramatic Change' in Longtime Immigration Policy Ends Open-Arms Welcome from `Los Americanos'

By 1994, Knight-Ridder Newspapers | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), August 2, 1994 | Go to article overview

U.S. Switch Has Cuban Exiles Feeling Betrayed `Dramatic Change' in Longtime Immigration Policy Ends Open-Arms Welcome from `Los Americanos'


1994, Knight-Ridder Newspapers, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


WHEN PRESIDENT BILL CLINTON announced Friday that Cuban refugees would no longer be received with open arms by the United States, he broke with a tradition that for 35 years has set the tone for relations between the two countries - and shattered the image of an exile community that believed itself to be special.

"He has pierced the heart of U.S. policy toward Cuba," said Rafael Penalver, a lawyer who is an immigration expert. "This is a radical departure from everything we've been used to."

By policy and by practice, Cubans have always received special treatment from the United States.

Even before Fidel Castro seized control of the government 35 years ago, Cubans gravitated to the United States: In the 1940s and 50s, they went to New York for the music and the opportunities; to Tampa, Fla., for jobs in the tobacco business; to Key West, Fla., for the adventure, the history and the romance.

The proximity of the two countries and the friendly relations they had enjoyed since the beginning of the century made it natural for Cubans to always look to "el norte" as a special place and to "los americanos" as special people. Los americanos, in turn, saw Cuba as an extension of the United States and visited the island frequently for business and pleasure.

After Castro, the flow from Cuba to the States intensified. Almost a million Cubans have immigrated in the past three decades in their quest for freedom.

But even if the reasons and the size of the immigration changed, the United States embraced almost all Cuban refugees who came to its shores for asylum.

In the early 1960s, there was Camarioca, a boatlift out of Matanzas, and Operation Pedro Pan, which brought hundreds of unaccompanied children to the United States.

By 1966, so many Cubans had settled in the United States that Congress passed the Cuban Adjustment Act, allowing Cubans to apply for residency a year and a day after they entered this country legally.

In the late 1960s, the so-called Freedom Flights from Cuba to Miami helped reunite families separated during the Pedro Pan years.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

U.S. Switch Has Cuban Exiles Feeling Betrayed `Dramatic Change' in Longtime Immigration Policy Ends Open-Arms Welcome from `Los Americanos'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.