When Speech Is Declared Illegal for Legal Immigrants

By Anthony Lewis Copyright New York Times News Service | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), August 21, 1994 | Go to article overview

When Speech Is Declared Illegal for Legal Immigrants


Anthony Lewis Copyright New York Times News Service, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Freedom for political speech has broader support in this country than ever before, I believe. Past repression of unpopular speakers seems anomalous today. One thing on which most conservatives and liberals now agree is respect for the First Amendment.

But not the U.S. Department of Justice. Not, at least, if one goes by an astonishing brief the department has just filed. In the teeth of precedent and logic, it argues that immigrants in this country have only as much freedom of speech as the government considers reasonable - and can be deported if they cross that vague line.

The brief was filed in the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in a seven-year-old deportation case against two Palestinians. It is the latest turn in a proceeding that is a model of how our government should not behave.

Eight men and women of Palestinian origin, living in California, were arrested in 1987, held in shackles, and described as "terrorists." The Immigration and Naturalization Service charged them with advocating "world communism" - but later dropped that charge.

The real problem of the eight was that they had raised money for the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, a radical group. The PFLP has carried out terrorism, but it also conducts peaceful political and relief activities. Judge William Webster, then director of the FBI, told Congress in 1987 that the eight had "not been found to have engaged themselves in terroristic activities."

Contributing money for peaceful purposes to a group that also engages in violence is plainly protected by the First Amendment. Many Americans gave money to the Nicaraguan Contras, and they could certainly not be prosecuted. Nevertheless the Immigration Service moved to deport Khader Hamide and Michel Shehadeh, who were lawfully in this country as permanent residents, under a 1990 law allowing deportation of those who support an organization "in conducting a terrorist activity." Many experts in immigration law protested that that language did not cover what these two men had done, but the INS persisted.

The INS sought to deport the six others for technical violations. It said, for example, that one who had a student visa failed to take enough credits one year. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

When Speech Is Declared Illegal for Legal Immigrants
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.