U.S. Tests on Humans Date to '30S in Wwii, Informed Consent Was Required - but Not Always Gotten

By 1994, Scripps Howard News Service | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), August 21, 1994 | Go to article overview

U.S. Tests on Humans Date to '30S in Wwii, Informed Consent Was Required - but Not Always Gotten


1994, Scripps Howard News Service, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


EXPERIMENTATION ON humans has been a touchy topic in some parts of the federal government for more than 60 years - much earlier than previously thought, according to newly discovered documents.

The documents, released recently by the White House Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments, show that the Navy, at least from the 1930s, required its secretary's approval for any human experiments.

During World War II, the Committee on Medical Research, the predecessor to the National Institutes of Health, required fully informed volunteers and consent forms for any human experiments.

Such policies mark a sharp contrast to what was happening with the Manhattan Project, where in 1945 officials approved a top-secret experiment in which 18 people were injected with plutonium without their knowledge or consent.

Discovering how the federal government's human experiment policies have evolved, as well as how those policies have been implemented, is among the main puzzles now being worked out by the advisory committee.

Composed of 14 scientists, ethicists and physicians, the committee has a year to unravel the history of government-sponsored human radiation experiments, spotlighting what ethical policies may have governed such testing.

A key job for the committee is determining what standards of ethics should be used to judge the officials and doctors who conducted the human radiation experiments. The committee is also looking at contemporary standards to see if they need to be strengthened or overhauled. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

U.S. Tests on Humans Date to '30S in Wwii, Informed Consent Was Required - but Not Always Gotten
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.