You're Never Too Old to Take an Educational Trip to Europe

By Compiled From News Services | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), September 11, 1994 | Go to article overview

You're Never Too Old to Take an Educational Trip to Europe


Compiled From News Services, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Q. I am interested in joining an educational tour group planning a trip to Greece next spring. Can you provide information about such groups? A tour geared to older travelers would be fine.

A. Educational tours of Greece are abundant. Here are a few that are planned for next spring:

Classical Cruises, which arranges voyages with sponsoring educational institutions, has an Undiscovered Greek Islands cruise, co-sponsored by the Smithsonian Institution, April 30 to May 13, starting at $6,845 a person, based on double occupancy, on the all-suite Queen Odyssey (the former Royal Viking Queen).

The itinerary includes Athens, Nauplia, Seriphos, Siphnos, Naxos, Amorgos, Astypalaia, Leros, Patmos, Chios, Skopelos, Thasos and Samothrace. The guest lecturer has not yet been confirmed.

Classical Cruises, 132 East 70th Street, New York, N.Y. 10021; (212) 794-3200 or (800) 252-7745.

Elderhostel, a nonprofit educational organization based in Boston, runs programs for travelers 60 and older that combine classwork with field trips; there are about 20 trips to Greece departing from March to May. Accommodations are in hotels with private baths.

Elderhostel's 18-night Ancient World of Greece program, in cooperation with the American School of Classical Studies in Athens, visits major sites in the capital, Eleusis, Corinth, the island of Aegina, Nauplia, Mycenae, Epidaurus and Crete.

The price of $3,080 a person, double occupancy, includes air fare from New York, room and board. There are several departure dates, including April 7. Some Elderhostel programs combine land tours with study cruises on topics such as Aegean civilization and the Greek Island society. The cruises are on air-conditioned motor-powered sailboats averaging 116 feet in length. The double-occupancy cabins have private baths.

For example, a package combining a week's study tour focusing on Greek philosophy, based at the Hellenic American Union in Athens, with a week's Aegean Civilization cruise, departs April 6 and costs $3,501.

Elderhostel is at 75 Federal Street, Boston, Mass. 02110. Specify international or domestic catalog.

Interhostel, a travel-study program for adults over 50 sponsored by the University of New Hampshire Division of Continuing Education, is planning to repeat this year's Athens and the Greek Islands tour from May 10 to 24, 1995, in cooperation with the American College of Greece, Deree Campus. The 1995 price has not yet been set, but it is expected to be higher than this year's rate of $3,295 a person, which included round-trip flights from New York.

In Athens, the group will stay in dormitories at the American College, about three miles from the city center. Shared bathrooms are on each floor. In addition to sightseeing while based in Athens, the tour also includes a three-day stay on the Aegean islands of Mykonos and Delos. Ancient Greek culture, modern history, economics, philosophy, music and dance will be among the study topics.

Interhostel: University of New Hampshire Division of Continuing Education, 6 Garrison Avenue, Durham, N.H. 03824; (603) 862-1147.

*****

Q. My wife and I are making plans to drive to Regina, Saskatchewan, and back. Because it is a long ride we would like to rent or lease a cellular phone for a few days. Is that possible?

A. Many companies rent cellular phones either by the day, week or month. Anything longer than that and it would be cheaper to buy a phone. Check the phone book for cellular phone companies.

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