Oregon Blazes a Medical Trail Recent Vote Legalized Doctor-Assisted Suicide

By Crum, William C. | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), November 12, 1994 | Go to article overview

Oregon Blazes a Medical Trail Recent Vote Legalized Doctor-Assisted Suicide


Crum, William C., St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


AS SOON AS OREGON VOTERS passed a law allowing doctor-assisted suicide, AIDS patient Tim Shuck started planning to take advantage of it.

On Thursday, official tallies showed the ballot proposal had passed 52 percent to 48 percent. Shuck, who learned in April that the HIV virus is invading his brain, had talked to his doctor about suicide a day earlier.

"It allows me to have some control over my life," said Shuck, 45. "My decision was based on what my needs are going to be. Once my brain is gone, I see no purpose for me to be around."

When the measure on Tuesday's ballot takes effect Dec. 8, Oregon will become the only place in the nation that lets doctors hasten death for the dying.

A patient with six months or less to live will be able to ask a doctor to prescribe a lethal dose of drugs. At least two doctors must agree that the patient's condition is terminal, and the patient must ask three times, the last time in writing. Doctors must wait 15 days after this last request before writing the lethal prescription.

Doctors who follow the law's guidelines cannot be prosecuted or sanctioned by professional organizations and licensing boards. Other health professionals, such as pharmacists, do not receive the same protection.

The law pushes Oregon to the forefront of the movement to give the dying the freedom to choose when and how to end their lives. But it also raises difficult questions for doctors who have been trained to heal, not kill.

"Nobody wants Oregon to become a drop-in center for death," said Dr. Susan Tolle, director of the Center for Ethics in Health Care at Oregon Health Sciences University.

The seeds of the national debate over euthanasia were sown June 4, 1990, when Janet Adkins of Portland, a victim of Alzheimer's disease, killed herself in Michigan with the help of Dr. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Oregon Blazes a Medical Trail Recent Vote Legalized Doctor-Assisted Suicide
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.