Ex-Sen. Fulbright Dies; Critic of Vietnam War

By Compiled From News Services | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), February 1, 1995 | Go to article overview

Ex-Sen. Fulbright Dies; Critic of Vietnam War


Compiled From News Services, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Former Sen. J. William Fulbright of Arkansas, a foreign affairs specialist whose legislation led to the forming of the United Nations and a renowned scholarship program bearing his name, died Thursday. He was 89.

Mr. Fulbright suffered a stroke at his home in Washington. His health had been poor since a stroke in 1993, and he was hospitalized last month with pneumonia.

In 30 years in the U.S. Senate - 15 as chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee - Mr. Fulbright became one of Washington's most powerful figures on international matters.

A Democrat, he broke party ranks with President Lyndon B. Johnson and emerged as one of the leading critics of the Vietnam War in the 1960s.tfp

President Bill Clinton, a fellow Arkansan, praised his former mentor Thursday.

"I'm just profoundly grateful today for the conviction that he imparted to me when I was a young man, that we could make peace in the world if we seek better understanding, if we promote the exchanges among people, if we advance the cause of global education," Clinton said at the White House.

As a freshman senator, Sen. Fulbright proposed using funds from the sale of surplus property overseas to pay for foreign exchange programs for researchers and students. The legislation, which he frequently said he was most proud of, was designed to "increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the people of other countries."

The Fulbright scholarship program has sent about 200,000 students on overseas study.

"These people are of greater significance to our future than is another aircraft carrier that costs three times as much as this exchange program has cost in 40 years," he wrote in 1985.

One of the young people with whom he worked directly was Clinton, who worked as an intern at the Foreign Relations Committee while Sen. Fulbright was chairman.

In 1993, as president, Clinton awarded Mr. Fulbright the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor.

Mr. Fulbright came to the Senate in 1945 and, during his first term, caused a furor by suggesting that President Harry S Truman resign. He cast the lone vote opposing funding for Sen. Joseph McCarthy's investigatory committee. McCarthy, R-Wis., then branded Sen. Fulbright a communist sympathizer.

During the Vietnam War in the 1960s, he led questioning during televised congressional hearings that caused his rupture with Johnson. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Ex-Sen. Fulbright Dies; Critic of Vietnam War
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.