Staying Power Job Market Is Ripe for `Temps' Temporary Employment Firms Help Many Get Foot in Door

By Virginia Baldwin Hick Of the Post-Dispatch | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), February 15, 1995 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Staying Power Job Market Is Ripe for `Temps' Temporary Employment Firms Help Many Get Foot in Door


Virginia Baldwin Hick Of the Post-Dispatch, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Andrew Roberts worked in floor maintenance at a department store for more than two years before a temporary employment service helped him find a foundry job.

He started as a temporary worker at $5.50 an hour in the grinding department at Didion & Sons Foundry in St. Peters. A year and a half later, Roberts makes more than $8 as a permanent employee. He gets benefits and says he thinks he has a future.

Temporary jobs are "the way of the future," Roberts, 38, tells friends. "It's your best bet for getting a good job."

Increasing numbers of employers and workers such as Roberts see temporary employment services as an important middleman in the job market. The workers get a foot in the door to permanent employment. The employers cut personnel costs.

Employment analysts say the services are filling a gap in the changing job market. Bruce Steinberg, spokesman for the National Association of Temporary and Staffing Services, said the association's members provide 85 percent of the temporary jobs in the United States. Membership in the association - a measure of the increase in employment service companies - grew by nearly one-third in the past two years.

Twenty years ago, businesses turned to temporary employment services mainly to replace sick or vacationing employees. Now, as unemployment rates have dropped, temporary employment services find themselves spending more time recruiting and less time finding jobs, Steinberg said.

In the future, temporary services should figure into many more workers' career development plans, Steinberg said.

Workers should "recognize they have to be flexible," he said. "The paternalism of corporate life doesn't exist any longer, if it ever did."

Ferd Potthast, director of personnel at Didion, calls temporary services "my ancillary personnel department."

Didion makes parts for lawn mowers, tractors, pumps and other equipment. "This is a hard-working American job" that requires entering workers to learn the machinery and put in a good day's work, Potthast said.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Staying Power Job Market Is Ripe for `Temps' Temporary Employment Firms Help Many Get Foot in Door
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?