Uplink: Little Frim on Ground Floor of Internet Access

By Robert Manor Of the Post-Dispatch | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), February 2, 1995 | Go to article overview

Uplink: Little Frim on Ground Floor of Internet Access


Robert Manor Of the Post-Dispatch, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


The Internet guarantees money to no one, but it does offer the chance to work 90 hours a week. Just ask Steve Catanzaro.

Catanzaro is president of SDC Consulting Inc., a start-up company that provides access to the Internet for computer users in the St. Louis area under the name Inlink.

Inlink is a bit smaller than, say, a Sprint or an IBM. Catanzaro is Inlink's president, technical specialist, marketing head and the guy who answers the phone. His wife, Jeanne, helps out when she isn't teaching nursing.

After opening Inlink in May 1994, and working 80 to 90 hours a week since then, Catanzaro has finally turned a profit.

"Last month I made $500," he said. "This month, $1,000, maybe $2,000."

Expect growth.

You can't just sign on to the Internet. You need an access provider, someone who has a T1 telephone link to the Internet. T1 has the capacity to transmit enormous amounts of data. About 18 months ago Catanzaro wanted to get on the Internet, but could find no local company offering access.

"You could get in through Wash U.," he said, "but they only offered the service to companies." Out-of-town companies offered access, but that meant long-distance phone charges.

Catanzaro had been working as controller for the Zipp's drive-through hamburger chain when it was sold. He got some money out of the deal, but lost his employment. The Internet beckoned. "I needed a job," Catanzaro said. "I decided it was something you could make money on. I invested close to $150,000."

It would have cost more but he assembled a lot of the equipment himself. "This is not something you would jump into without technical ability," he said. He bought top-of-the-line computers, paid $28,000 for a T1 line, and began hustling for customers.

Anyone who has started up a hot-dog stand or a steel company knows what came next. Impossibly long hours for remarkably little money. How did Catanzaro live without an income?

"My wife was working," Catanzaro said. "Credit cards was the other part. I'm over the hump now. But it got down to the rock bottom."

With Internet's popularity growing rapidly, and mostly by word of mouth, the customers started to come to Inlink. "Luckily, I didn't have any competition during that period," Catanzaro said.

Many access providers charge a small monthly fee, say $15, but tack on a dollar-an-hour fee for every hour the user spends on the Internet. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Uplink: Little Frim on Ground Floor of Internet Access
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.