Oscar Honors Dianne Wiest Gets Second Award for a Supporting Role

By Ap | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), March 28, 1995 | Go to article overview

Oscar Honors Dianne Wiest Gets Second Award for a Supporting Role


Ap, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Dianne Wiest, the grandly melodramatic stage star who seduces a gullible playwright in Woody Allen's "Bullets Over Broadway," won her second Oscar as supporting actress Monday night.

"This is as surprising and marvelous as it was the first time," Wiest exclaimed as she began reading her acceptance speech. "Although this time, I need glasses."

She first won eight years ago in another Allen movie, "Hannah and Her Sisters."

The odds-on favorite as best picture at the 67th Academy Awards was "Forrest Gump," the surprise blockbuster about a slow-witted Southerner who becomes an improbable participant in world events.

And Tom Hanks, the star of "Gump" who won last year as a lawyer dying of AIDS in "Philadelphia," had a shot at becoming only the second repeat best-actor winner in Oscar history. Spencer Tracy did it in 1937-38.

The Paramount movie drew a near-record 13 Academy Award nominations and scored a huge success at the box office. Its gross of more than $317 million puts it in the No. 4 spot on Hollywood's list of all-time moneymakers.

The 1950 classic "All About Eve" holds the record with 14 nominations. It won five Oscars.

Other multiple nominees this year included "Pulp Fiction," "Bullets Over Broadway" and "The Shawshank Redemption" with seven apiece.

Jessica Lange was favored to claim the best actress prize as an unhappy Army wife in "Blue Sky."

That movie took an unlikely path to the Oscars: It was shelved for four years because of studio financial troubles; its director, Tony Richardson, died before it was released; and it was a box-office flop despite good reviews.

The ceremonies at the Shrine Auditorium had a different host for the third straight year - CBS late-night star David Letterman, who appeared nervous and somewhat off his comic stride in his opening monologue.

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