Families Don't Get Gjust Deserts in Palm Springs

By Story and Photo Martha Shirk Of the Post-Dispatch | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), April 9, 1995 | Go to article overview

Families Don't Get Gjust Deserts in Palm Springs


Story and Photo Martha Shirk Of the Post-Dispatch, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


IF YOU DON'T enjoy golf, wallowing in mud baths, or Bob Hope's humor, is there any reason to visit California's most famous desert oasis?

Absolutely. Especially if you've got kids in tow and your idea of fun runs to hiking, immersing yourself in a completely different ecology and learning a little about the richest Indian tribe in North America.

Although Palm Springs earned its reputation as a playground for Hollywood stars, we discovered much to recommend it as a destination for ordinary families during a recent mini vacation there.

We had just a few objectives during our three-day visit:

To build in plenty of swimming time for our two sons, ages 7 and 9, who, like us, were tired of St. Louis' winter weather.

To avoid eating every meal at a fast food restaurant.

To spend as much time as possible exploring the desert.

To relax.

The swimming part was easy. We stayed at one of the area's half-dozen destination resorts, the Westin Mission Hills Resort, in nearby Rancho Mirage. We chose this resort with the kids' priorities in mind; its large heated pool has a serpentine water slide. Over three days, the kids hurtled down at least 100 times each. (Their mother tried it, too, and laughed harder than she has in years.)

Relaxing wasn't difficult, either. The air in the desert seems to have magical properties (Angelinos, in fact, come here to escape the smog). Lying on a chaise longue overlooking an emerald green golf course and the purplish Santa Rosa Mountains made the winter doldrums just melt away.

As for eating, we were successful beyond our dreams. Palm Springs' main street, Palm Canyon Drive, is lined with all sorts of restaurants, many with patios. Our children ate Japanese, Mexican and New Mexican food without complaint.

But the most rewarding part of our stay was the time we spent outside.

I confess to having been a snob about Palm Springs before I visited. I thought of it as one big golf course (actually, there are more than 80). With streets named after people like Dinah Shore, Fred Waring and Frank Sinatra, and as many plastic surgeons as pediatricians in the phone book, I couldn't imagine feeling comfortable there.

I had no idea I'd fall in love with the scenery.

It's hard to find words to describe the natural beauty of the area. Just a few hundred yards from Palm Canyon Drive, the 10,000-feet-plus peaks of the San Jacinto Mountains rise up from the desert floor. The Little San Bernardino Mountains to the north and the Santa Rosa Mountains to the southeast complete the backdrop.

We spent most of a day hiking in one of the canyons that drain the San Jacinto foothills. They're called the Indian Canyons because they're on the reservation of the Agua Caliente Cahulla Indians. The tribe's ancestors settled the area centuries ago because of its abundant water and bountiful plant and animal life. Today, the tribe owns 42 percent of the prosperous Coachella Valley, including the Spa Hotel, where you can take a mud bath, and several casinos.

We hiked Palm Canyon, the most popular of the three canyons that are open to the public. Palm Canyon is home to the largest stand of neo Washingtonia fillifera palms in the world - 3,300 of them. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Families Don't Get Gjust Deserts in Palm Springs
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.