La Police Worker Denies He Altered Simpson's Blood Analysis

By Ap | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), May 6, 1995 | Go to article overview

La Police Worker Denies He Altered Simpson's Blood Analysis


Ap, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


The battle over O.J. Simpson's blood intensified Friday as the defense accused a police chemist of purposely misreading test results and claimed that FBI tests supported blood-tampering allegations.

Gregory Matheson, assistant director of the police crime lab, denied that he skewed his blood analysis in favor of the prosecution.

When asked if he was violating ethics by choosing an interpretation favoring his employer, Matheson declared: "I am not!"

In another development, the family of one of the murder vicitms, Ronald Goldman, filed a wrongful death lawsuit against Simpson, accusing him of conduct "outrageous beyond the ability of ordinary human beings to comprehend."

The suit, which seeks unspecified damages, was filed Thursday by Goldman's sister, Kimberly, and his father, Fred, said Robert Tourtelot, a lawyer for the Goldman family.

"This is a very difficult time for them and no amount of money will bring back Mr. Goldman's son and Kimberly's brother," Tourtelot said.

He said they had to file the suit within a year of the June 12 slayings of Goldman and Simpson's ex-wife, Nicole Brown Simpson.

Judge Lance Ito, meanwhile, refused to allow questioning of Matheson about whether FBI tests on two key blood samples - taken from a sock and a gate near the murder scene - turned up signs of a preservative used in police storage of a vial of Simpson's blood.

Defense attorney Robert Blasier previously suggested that presence of the preservative EDTA would prove a plot to frame Simpson for the murders. Without the jury present Friday, Blasier told the judge EDTA was found by the FBI in blood taken from a sock in Simpson's bedroom and a back gate to his ex-wife's condominium.

"Our experts have looked at the FBI results and have said it's present," Blasier said.

Prosecutor Hank Goldberg said the tests showed the opposite, but he lost a bid to drop hints about the preservative through his own hypothetical questions.

"What's the good faith basis of your offer, Mr. Goldberg, that there's no EDTA?" Ito asked.

"The good faith basis of my offer is that in reading the FBI report that's what it says," Goldberg replied. …

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