Environmental Problems Fuel New Industry but Cleanup Has Own Headaches

By Robert Sanford Of the Post-Dispatch | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), May 25, 1995 | Go to article overview

Environmental Problems Fuel New Industry but Cleanup Has Own Headaches


Robert Sanford Of the Post-Dispatch, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


This year more than 2,000 Missouri businesses will be required to file for permits to operate in compliance with state and federal clean air rules.

The simplest sort of permit - called a Basic permit in the rules - could be relatively easy to obtain, but the red tape can become uncomfortable for businesses requiring a more complicated permit - called a Major permit.

Richard Waters, an environmental lawyer with Armstrong, Teasdale, Schlafly & Davis, trecalls a case that generated a 3-inch stack of documents. An outside consultant took 800 hours to prepare the stack and an employee matched that time. And some stacks grow two or three times as high, Waters said.

The need for all that paper - and for operating solutions to environmental programs - has spawned an entire industry. The St. Louis Yellow Pages lists more than 100 companies under environmental and ecological services, including engineers, consultants, laboratories, asbestos removers, waste-management firms, real-estate appraisers and recycling programs. They also include two big St. Louis companies, Monsanto Co. and Sverdrup Corp.

Monsanto Enviro-Chem estimates its annual revenue at more than $150 million. Sverdrup Environmental does $50 million of business a year, and wants to push that to $100 million in two years.

"A general estimate puts the national market at $100 billion," said Michael Neumann, a vice president at Sverdrup. "One hundred billion is a boom figure. But for some it's a bust market.

"It's tricky. A company that we worked with on the Times Beach project changed its name three times in 18 months. It was acquired again and again. You weren't quite sure what its name was."

Anthony G. Corey, vice president for products and environmental systems at Monsanto, described the industry as huge and highly fragmented. He said a new company might succeed if it found a niche and performed well. "But you have to be good at what you do," he said.

The immediate future of environmental projects seems to rest with the new Congress. If Congress cuts programs deeply it will carry the stigma of being "anti-environment." The issue could be a hot political topic playing Congress against the Clinton administration, which has taken a pro-environment stance.

But some cuts would not be fatal, Alan L. Farkas, an industry consultant, told participants at a recent Washington conference. He said that the $3 billion water quality market had grown 5 percent in 1994, the best increase in four years. If the budgets of the departments of Energy Defense are cut 10 percent to 15 percent in the next two years, there still will be a strong market for environmental constructors, he said.

Consultants will face tougher prospects. Action in the market is shifting from identifying polluted sites to cleaning them up, Farkas said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Environmental Problems Fuel New Industry but Cleanup Has Own Headaches
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.