Reviews Recordings

By Cary Darling/Orange County Register Kevin O'Hare/ Newhouse News Service Sandy Masuo/Los Anglese Times | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), July 21, 1995 | Go to article overview

Reviews Recordings


Cary Darling/Orange County Register Kevin O'Hare/ Newhouse News Service Sandy Masuo/Los Anglese Times, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


"DREAMING OF YOU" Selena (EMI)

When listening to the posthumous "Dreaming of You," the best way to appreciate the loss Selena fans felt after her killing is to fast-forward through the opening three tracks. These songs were to be her armaments in the crossover war and, sure enough, they're catchy, state-of-the-art pop/R&B - but, despite the sublime melody of "I Could Fall in Love," strikingly anonymous.

The real Selena comes through on the fourth track, "God's Child (Baila Conmigo)," a duet with David Byrne for the coming film "Blue in the Face." It's a wonderful acoustic guitar, bass and percussion rave-up that shows the expressiveness of her voice.

Then it's back to pop business as usual for the title track and the previously released "Missing My Baby," though the latter (remixed by Full Force) is utterly charming thanks to the song's neo-'60s soul sashay.

But it's the second half of "Dreaming" - a potpourri of past hits - where Selena really shines, whether it's in the mariachi dreams of "El Toro Relajo" and "Tu Solo Tu" or the infectious cumbia/reggae vibe of "Bidi Bidi Bom Bom." Then the loss becomes clear.

- Cary Darling, Orange County Register "KING BISCUIT FLOWER HOUR PRESENTS . . . " Various artists (King Biscuit Flower Hour)

At tag sales and flea markets, the clueless and shameless hawk their junk vinyl, thinking that what all record collectors lust for are trashed and tattered old Elvis albums.

But the real connoisseurs know a whole lot better about what exactly sends hard-core collectors into a heart-palpitating, leg-shaking, tongue-tied tizzy.

Radio shows.

Intended solely for broadcast purposes and not for commercial release, those rare recordings of concerts and interviews generally command big bucks in collectors' circles.

One of the granddaddies of all radio shows is "The King Biscuit Flower Hour," which since 1973 has broadcast more than 1,000 installments featuring more than 450 artists to radio stations across the country.

Now, for the first time, many of those long-sought concert recordings are being commercially released for the first time. Recently, King Biscuit unleashed the first installment of vintage broadcasts, featuring six recordings culled from its archives. The series is expected to continue with six to eight additional titles per quarter, and the next batch is due in October.

While acts as big as John Lennon, Bruce Springsteen, U2 and Eric Clapton have been featured on the Biscuit, don't look for those shows to surface commercially in the near future. Anything's possible, but labels tend to get in the way of such superstar releases. …

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