Expert: Blood Put on Empty Sock Stain Was Pressed, Not Spattered, Simpson Defense Witness Says

By Ap | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), July 28, 1995 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Expert: Blood Put on Empty Sock Stain Was Pressed, Not Spattered, Simpson Defense Witness Says


Ap, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Blood on a sock found in O.J. Simpson's bedroom was not spattered but was applied through "direct compression," a forensics expert testified Thursday.

Herbert MacDonell told jurors that the blood had seeped through the sock at the ankle to the opposite side, indicating that no foot was inside when the stain was deposited. The stain measures 1 inch by 1 1/2 inches.

"The ankle stain was very large," MacDonell said. "It was not spattered. . . . I concluded it was from compression movement."

Asked to explain, he said the blood was not smeared but was consistent with someone having blood on his or her finger and touching the fabric.

The prosecution has alleged that Nicole Brown Simpson's blood splashed onto her former husband's socks, perhaps as he slashed her and her friend Ronald Goldman to death. Simpson's defense says the socks were bloodied and planted to incriminate him.

Nicole Simpson and Goldman were slain outside her condominium on June 12, 1994. The next day, police collected the pair of dark socks they said had been found on a rug at the foot of Simpson's bed. One officer testified last week that the socks seemed "out of place" in the neatly kept bedroom.

Prosecution witnesses have said that they at first did not notice blood on the socks but that microscopic analysis revealed it later.

Peter Neufeld, a defense attorney, showed jurors microscopic photographs of the sock fabric that MacDonell said had "small red balls that appeared to be a dried liquid on the inside.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Expert: Blood Put on Empty Sock Stain Was Pressed, Not Spattered, Simpson Defense Witness Says
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?