Abortion Is Wrong, `Jane Roe' Now Says

By Compiled From News Services | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), August 11, 1995 | Go to article overview

Abortion Is Wrong, `Jane Roe' Now Says


Compiled From News Services, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


The woman plaintiff in the 1973 Roe vs. Wade decision said Thursday that she would help "save babies" after being baptized by the national director of the anti-abortion group Operation Rescue.

Norma McCorvey, known as Jane Roe in the landmark Supreme Court ruling that legalized abortion nationwide, says she is no longer a supporter of abortion rights.

She told radio station WBAP that she plans to help women "save their babies" and "won't be doing pro-choice stuff. . . . I'm pro-life. I think I've always been pro-life, I just didn't know it."

McCorvey, 47, added in an interview with ABC, "I think abortion is wrong. I think what I did was wrong."

She renounced her former belief in a woman's right to choose, saying she had been haunted by the sight of empty swings in a playground. "They were swinging back and forth but they were all empty, and I just totally lost it. And I thought, Oh my God, the playgrounds are empty because there's not children, because they've all been aborted."

The Rev. Philip "Flip" Benham, the fundamentalist preacher who took over Operation Rescue last year, said he baptized McCorvey in the company of about 35 of her close friends Tuesday night at a home in suburban Garland, Texas. "It was a small little service . . . and there was weeping and there was great joy and praising."

Benham added, "This whole issue has now come back to Dallas, and Jesus Christ has reached through the abortion mill wall and touched the heart of Norma McCorvey."

On March 31, Operation Rescue moved its national headquarters into an office adjoining the abortion clinic where McCorvey worked as marketing director. At that time, McCorvey said she was "horrified" and concerned about possible violence.

But then Benham and McCorvey became friends. He called her "Miss Norma." She called him "Flipper." McCorvey acknowledged they were an unlikely match, calling their friendship a "pretty bizarre relationship. …

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