THE HUMAN DIMENSION HOW THE LATEST IMMIGRANTS COPE WITH THEIR NEW WORLD, AND HOW WE DEAL WITH THEM, WILL DETERMINE THEIR IMPACT ON U.S. SOCIETY Series: AN INVISIBLE POPULATION This Is the Last in an Occasional Series about How Immigrants Are Adapting to, and Changing, St. Louis

By Philip Dine Of the Post-Dispatch | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), December 17, 1995 | Go to article overview

THE HUMAN DIMENSION HOW THE LATEST IMMIGRANTS COPE WITH THEIR NEW WORLD, AND HOW WE DEAL WITH THEM, WILL DETERMINE THEIR IMPACT ON U.S. SOCIETY Series: AN INVISIBLE POPULATION This Is the Last in an Occasional Series about How Immigrants Are Adapting to, and Changing, St. Louis


Philip Dine Of the Post-Dispatch, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


WHERE, Fuad Kadiric wondered, should he turn?

A sturdy jaw and brown leather jacket lent an air of bravado, but this 41-year-old from Bosnia was foundering on several fronts. His job at a metal factory had ended abruptly after seven months because he took off a Muslim holy day, though he'd agreed to work a makeup day.

His son, Denis, was fired with him for the same reason. The 17-year-old had begun work a few weeks earlier, after quitting the ninth grade when he was stabbed by a young immigrant from another country.

Kadiric had no idea where to turn for representation, for someone to speak for him. How should he deal with the employer, the school, the police?

The anger was welling up again, the type he'd pushed away after the dream house he built in Sarajevo was destroyed in the war.

He used to be able to share his feelings Saturday nights at the Bosnian Club in a warehouse on South Vandeventer Avenue. But then the doors closed most weekends, partly a result of divisions within a rapidly growing population still reeling from the war.

Immigrants and refugees here are grappling with personal and family struggles, facing social and ethnic tensions or searching for a voice.

Meanwhile, the national debate on immigration rages - over whether the influx should be curtailed and at what level, how to keep out illegal immigrants, what services to restrict, how to compute the economic balance sheet.

But the discussion neglects a key dimension: the human side of immigration.

Whatever policy decisions are made in Washington, millions of new immigrants and refugees are in this country and more are on their way. In the St. Louis area, they number 80,000 and are expected to top 100,000 before the turn of the century.

How they adapt to the situation they find and cope with what they left behind, and how local communities and institutions respond to them, will in large measure condition their impact on their host society.

"Obviously these people are here, so what do we do?" asks Linda Sharpe-Taylor of Provident Counseling, which has begun to work with newcomers in greatest need. An Emotional Gantlet

Gedlu Metaferia, director of the Ethiopian Community Association of Missouri, knew the family he was helping to adjust to life here was in trouble once the wife learned she had rights.

"He wants her to treat him like a king, bring him dinner," Metaferia confided in late May in his basement office at a South Side church. "She is not 100 percent right either. She just says - `This is America.' "

Without resources to hire a social worker familiar with the local system, Metaferia translated literature into Amharic, brought over legal brochures, engaged a traditional priest.

"We are crossing our fingers," said his assistant, Yenework Musse. And the two kept counseling as they knew best.

But on a Saturday night in late August, the couple's 5-year-old daughter let police into the dreary Hickory Street housing unit. Officers found the mother's body under a bloody blanket in the basement, her throat slashed with a kitchen knife. The father hung from a rope tied to a stair railing.

At the funeral of Melishew Terefe, 26, and her husband, Negussie Tsege, 34, Metaferia pleaded for women from Africa and elsewhere to be more open about the taboo topic of domestic violence.

Now, Metaferia says, "I see another tragedy coming, even as I talk to you. It may not happen, but this is what I suspect because of the conflict, because he beats her."

The murder-suicide sparked Sharpe-Taylor's counseling agency to set up English courses for Ethiopian and Somali women who stay at home - many in the same housing development - to help ease a severe isolation she says fosters and conceals domestic problems.

The tragic end to this case was highly unusual, the conflicts that drove it less so. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

THE HUMAN DIMENSION HOW THE LATEST IMMIGRANTS COPE WITH THEIR NEW WORLD, AND HOW WE DEAL WITH THEM, WILL DETERMINE THEIR IMPACT ON U.S. SOCIETY Series: AN INVISIBLE POPULATION This Is the Last in an Occasional Series about How Immigrants Are Adapting to, and Changing, St. Louis
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.