By Design Middle School Building to Enhance Team-Teaching Concept

By Raymond W. Vodicka Of The St. Charles Post | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), June 11, 1996 | Go to article overview

By Design Middle School Building to Enhance Team-Teaching Concept


Raymond W. Vodicka Of The St. Charles Post, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


When the first phase of the new Francis Howell middle school opens Aug. 22 in the Cottleville area, the school's emphasis toward teamwork should be obvious.

The layout of what will be Louis C. Saeger Middle School, said Principal-designate Ed Morris, promotes team teaching. Three-teacher teams at the school, with each teacher having about 25 students, will allow teachers to better track the students through core subjects such as math, science, social studies and English. Under the setup, he said, teachers will be able to monitor student progress and give extra help, encouragement or praise, as needed.

A flexible layout for the building was drawn up by a team of teachers, administrators, architects and construction workers. The team learned from past building projects in the rapidly expanding district. The school district is the largest in the county.

"We have the ability to change space, so we have areas throughout where we can open the rooms for joint teaching, for integrating curriculum, for multiple-type projects," Morris said.

The first phase of the school on Highway N will have 23 classrooms and a multipurpose room that will serve as a cafeteria and gym. Most of the building will have two stories, except for the one-story administration area.

Several classrooms on the second floor will have folding walls that will be able to be opened to make space for about 80 people, in the event of large classes or meetings. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

By Design Middle School Building to Enhance Team-Teaching Concept
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.