Pizzarelli Trio: More Than Tribute to Nat `King' Cole

By Perkins, Terry | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), April 11, 1996 | Go to article overview

Pizzarelli Trio: More Than Tribute to Nat `King' Cole


Perkins, Terry, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


WHEN the John Pizzarelli Trio performed at Jazz at the Bistro last August, it might have been possible to attribute the overflow crowds in attendance to the fact the City's top jazz club was celebrating its grand opening.

But there was no doubt why the capacity crowd showed up Tuesday evening at the Bistro. Guitarist Pizzarelli, his brother Martin on double bass and Ray Kennedy on piano have developed a strong following in St. Louis - and across the country - with a smoothly swinging sound that pays strong tribute to the distinctive style of the legendary Nat "King" Cole Trio.

Cole's trio wasn't the first to work in a setting without a drummer, but it certainly became the most popular. The format was later adopted by musicians such as Art Tatum, Oscar Peterson and Ahmad Jamal, but it's become something of a rarity on the contemporary jazz scene. But the guitar, piano, bass setting appears to be an ideal setting for John Pizzarelli's talents. He has a finely-honed guitar technique that focuses on rhythmic chord changes, but he can also pick his way flawlessly through fast-paced single note solos. Add a singing voice that seems perfectly suited to Cole's easy-going brand of swing, and it's easy to see why John Pizzarelli has chosen to follow Cole's lead. During the opening set, they were at their best performing Cole classics like "Straighten Up and Fly Right" and "Sweet Lorraine." On the former tune, the three musicians captured the essential groove of Cole's original version - but added their own unique touch as well. During an extended instrumental, John Pizzarelli and Ray Kennedy engaged in a free form dialogue that showcased their musical skill - and sense of humor.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Pizzarelli Trio: More Than Tribute to Nat `King' Cole
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.