NRA Researcher Links Race, Homicide Rate

By 1996, The Washington Post | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), August 11, 1996 | Go to article overview

NRA Researcher Links Race, Homicide Rate


1996, The Washington Post, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


A statistician for the National Rifle Association insists that race is a more important factor in the nation's homicide rate than the availability of guns.

"Textbook epidemiology notes that despite the controversy of studying disease by race, differences in frequency and severity among racial groups may be too great to ignore," Paul H. Blackman said in a paper he has delivered at meetings of criminologists and health researchers.

Blackman's research puts a controversial new twist on the NRA's gun r ights orthodoxy and is part of a growing body of work being developed by gun rights proponents targeting gun control advocates who argue that increased availability of firearms increases the risk of homicide.

Some statisticians agree with Blackman's statistical analysis, but disagree with his conclusion that the widespread availability of handguns is not a factor in homicide.

"Violence and homicide are caused by many different factors. There is no question that African-Americans are disproportionately perpetrators and victims of homicide," said James Mercy, acting director of the division of violence prevention at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

"That has nothing to do with race, per se. It has to do with the fact that African-Americans are disproportionately poorer and affected by economic problems. And that fact doesn't mean there is no role played by access to and availability to firearms."

By isolating race as a factor in homicide, his critics say, Blackman's assertion is underlined by the same notions that motivate some researchers to look for genetic links to crime. Proponents of that view believe genetic faults make some people more prone to violence than others. But critics of that view believe that the prospect of finding a scientifically verifiable genetic link is dim and that the claim plays into the hands of racists. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

NRA Researcher Links Race, Homicide Rate
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.