Isaacs Takes Page from Her Books at Middle Age, the Sassy Writer's Got It Together

By Colleen O'Connor Of the Dallas Morning News | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), August 18, 1996 | Go to article overview

Isaacs Takes Page from Her Books at Middle Age, the Sassy Writer's Got It Together


Colleen O'Connor Of the Dallas Morning News, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


SHE'S like the witty, gutsy heroine in one of her own best-selling mystery novels.

Resourceful, to start with. The day Susan Isaacs dropped her youngest child off at nursery school for the first time, she drove straight home and started her first novel. She had no college degree, no high-powered career - nothing that would indicate a megabucks future of hot novels, Hollywood movies, a house in the Hamptons and a pied-a-terre in Manhattan.

On a recent summer afternoon, Isaacs traveled from her Long Island home into Manhattan to meet a visitor in her apartment on Central Park South, just up the street from the St. Moritz and The Plaza.

She wrote that first novel in the bedroom, papers scattered over bed and pillows, swept away by the adventures of her heroine, a Long Island housewife whose pornography-loving dentist is killed one day. Each night her lawyer-husband would come home, read her day's work, tell her she was really on to something.

He wasn't kidding.

"Compromising Positions" became an instant best seller, then a successful movie starring Susan Sarandon and Raul Julia. Since then, each of her seven mysteries has become a best seller, and "Hello Again" was also made into a movie.

Her latest mystery, "Lily White," hit best-seller lists right after its release this month. Whoopi Goldberg snatched up the movie rights, and production is expected to start soon, with Isaacs as co-producer.

Nothing mysterious about her popularity, however.

"I think people who read her books recognize something in her characters they might like to do or be themselves," says Amy Fikes, owner of the Mystery Book Store in Dallas. "There's a connection."

Part of her broad appeal, Fikes believes, is that "she crosses the mystery genre into general fiction. Her plots are tight, she's humorous but serious at the same time. She has insights into serious issues without being depressing."

Critics are calling "Lily White" her most confident and appealing book so far. Perhaps it's because her heroine, Lee White, has a dark side - hidden wounds beneath her relentless humor that give depth to her character. There's a mystery behind the mystery.

Lee is a criminal-defense lawyer whose client - a con man running a love-'em-and-leave-'em marriage scam - is arrested for murder. She grabbed Isaacs' interest one day as she worked on the book's outline.

"I heard her say, `I was never a virgin,' " says Isaacs. "I thought, `Oh, that's fun. I like that! I know exactly what she means.' "

And so the story begins:

"I was never a virgin.

"OK: In the technical sense, of course I was. But even in my dewy days, I never gazed at the world wide-eyed with wonder. If I wasn't born shrewd, at least I grew up too smart to be naive."

Isaacs, with her kohl-rimmed eyes, dark, curly hair and a black-lace camisole peeking from the bodice of her pantsuit, resembles her heroines in ways that transcend the grit and wisecracks. Usually in their 40s, they're middle-age women with strong sexuality and a growing sense of personal power. This is no accident.

"One of the joys of growing older is self-knowledge, and being able to do away with pretense," says Isaacs, who is 52. "When you know what you are and what you aren't, you bloom emotionally and you bloom sexually.

"I see women who are washed up at 28. Nothing much is going to happen to them for the rest of their lives. They lack energy, they lack elan, they lack hope.

"Other women spend huge amounts of money on cosmetics, or their hair, or clothes, go to exercise class, massage anticellulite cream into their thighs every night and every morning. They do everything, and they never find men.

"Then there are women who look like a sack of potatoes with lipstick on, and they do wonderfully because they're capable of fun, they give off an aura of `I like men, I like sex, and mostly, I like myself.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Isaacs Takes Page from Her Books at Middle Age, the Sassy Writer's Got It Together
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.