Clinton Orders Boost in Airport Security President Lobbies for Anti-Terror Spending

By Compiled From News Services Mark Schlinkmann Of The Post-Dispatch Provided Some Information . | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), September 1, 1996 | Go to article overview

Clinton Orders Boost in Airport Security President Lobbies for Anti-Terror Spending


Compiled From News Services Mark Schlinkmann Of The Post-Dispatch Provided Some Information ., St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


President Bill Clinton issued orders Monday to tighten airport security and challenged Congress to support $1.1 billion in new spending to fight global terrorism.

The request cobbles together a number of long-standing anti-terror initiatives and a list of recommendations from a new commission to find ways to make air travel safer.

Among the items in the package are advanced new screening devices for airline passengers and cargo and the hiring or transfer of as many as 500 FBI agents to deter and investigate domestic terrorism. "We know we can't make the world risk-free, but we can reduce the risk we face, and we have to take the fight to the terrorists," Clinton said at an Oval Office ceremony at which he accepted the recommendations of the aviation safety panel. "If we have the will, we can find the means." The $1.1 billion package has two primary components - $429 million in spending for aviation security urged by the commission, headed by Vice President Al Gore, and $667 million in anti-terrorism spending at a variety of federal agencies. Clinton issued an election-year challenge to Congress to pass the package before lawmakers leave town to campaign for re- election. "Terrorists don't wait," he said. "And neither should we. In embracing the report, Clinton: Ordered immediate criminal background checks of airline workers with access to secure areas. Directed the Federal Aviation Administration to set up a system in certain airports to match each piece of luggage with a passenger. An Air Transport Association spokesman said such a system could cause long delays. Promised to sign an executive order making the National Transportation Safety Board the point agency to help families of plane crash victims. Sought to increase the FAA's security work force by 600 positions. The goal of matching luggage to passengers is to prevent anyone from checking a bag and then not boarding a plane. With 500 million domestic passengers a year, each carrying an average of 1.7 bags, "you're talking about one of the biggest logistical problems you could imagine," said David A. Fuscus, spokesman for the Air Transport Association, the trade association for U.S. airlines. "We're going to cooperate, but it's a huge job." Under the president's directive, the FAA would require the baggage matches at certain airports - including at least one big hub - within 60 days to determine the best procedure. Officials at Lambert Field and its two main carriers - Trans World Airlines and Southwest Airlines - said Monday they had not been told yet whether Lambert would be among the airports initially affected by the changes. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Clinton Orders Boost in Airport Security President Lobbies for Anti-Terror Spending
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.