Live-In Feels Left out of Class Reunion Plans

By Buren, Abigail Van | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), September 12, 1996 | Go to article overview

Live-In Feels Left out of Class Reunion Plans


Buren, Abigail Van, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Dear Abby: My live-in companion (call her Beth) is having a 55-year class reunion in about a month. We have lived together for eight years, travel together, attend church together, etc.

The trouble is, when she received her information on the reunion, she answered the questionnaire saying her husband was deceased, she was active in church groups, had friends, traveled all the time (last year to Australia, Hawaii and Mexico) - not once mentioning that she had a companion.

I pay for all her trips and all of her expenses. I feel left out by her failing to mention me. I don't even want to go to the class reunion. Please give me some advice. LEFT OUT Perhaps your companion felt uncomfortable disclosing on a questionnaire that she is living with and traveling with someone who is not her husband, so try not to take her omission personally. If she wants you to attend her 55-year reunion with her, stop pouting and go - and you'll both probably have a wonderful time. Dear Abby: Thank you so much for a wonderful idea! Stan and Dell Slack celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary on July 4. Since all of their relatives lived out of state, we felt that a party would be too hard to pull off. We saw a letter in your column from Kay and Carol about their parents' 50th. Nanny and Poppy Slack went on vacation and we "borrowed" their Christmas card list. We loaded all the addresses onto the computer and printed out labels. We chose attractive computer stationery (the American flag for the July 4 date!) for our letter - and mailed out 70 copies. We asked everyone to send Nanny and Poppy a memory or experience that they had shared sometime during the last 50 years. Two days before the big day, Nanny called and asked what we did.

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