Aids Prevention and Education Are Focus of Agency

By Victor Volland Of The Post-Dispatch | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), October 27, 1996 | Go to article overview

Aids Prevention and Education Are Focus of Agency


Victor Volland Of The Post-Dispatch, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


The old dictum equating an "ounce of prevention" with a "pound of cure" goes double for a devastating disease such as AIDS.

"Prevention and educating people about prevention is what St. Louis Effort for AIDS is all about," said Jean Cavender, director of volunteer services for the area's biggest and oldest agency helping those who have AIDS or who are infected with HIV. The agency is in its 11th year.

Prevention strategies are the only weapon at present against spread of the viral, mostly sexually transmitted disease that still has no cure, Cavender said. "To change behavior, you have to change thinking," she emphasized. "To change thinking, you have to educate." St. Louis Effort for AIDS, a United Way nonprofit agency, targets its outreach education programs to specific groups who are at risk - not only gays and bisexuals, but also heterosexual college students, women and blacks. The incidence of HIV infection continues to fall among homosexuals, who have been hit the hardest and longest by the disease and have learned to practice safe sex and even abstinence, Cavender noted. Poor minorities have become especially at risk, said Mark Pickering, the agency's executive director. Last year, AIDS was the leading cause of death among Americans 25 to 44 years, with the rate among African-Americans four times that for whites and the rate among Latinos, especially males, also disproportionately high, he said. "We speculate that members of these groups still believe they're not particularly at risk, that it's a gays-only problem, and they don't bother to take precautions," Pickering said. Joy Steele, an agency case manager, said she is seeing many more heterosexuals - men and women, white and nonwhite. One of her cases was a homeless black man in his early 30s who moved to St. Louis and didn't where or how to find help when his HIV infection graduated into full-blown AIDS. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Aids Prevention and Education Are Focus of Agency
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.