A Costly Election for Labor Unions

By E. J. Dionne Washington Post Writers Group | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), November 12, 1996 | Go to article overview

A Costly Election for Labor Unions


E. J. Dionne Washington Post Writers Group, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


If you want a nuclear explosion from a Republican, just mention the word "unions."

Republicans are furious at the effort of organized labor to displace their party's congressional majority. The phrase "Big Labor" (or "Big Labor Bosses") is for Republicans what the words "Religious Right Extremists" are for Democrats.

It's odd that neither side can understand how similar their respective animosities are. For Democrats, labor's activism is great and the activism of the Christian Right (and the National Rifle Association) is terrible. For Republicans, the works of the religious conservatives and the NRA are moral and labor's doings are beyond the pale. "We stand at Armageddon and we battle for the Lord," declared Theodore Roosevelt in launching his Progressive Party candidacy in 1912. When things get that serioW 2/3 - 1/5 1/5at the unions failed because the Republicans still control Congress. There is something to this. When you set out to displace the King, you had better succeed. If you fail, the K ing will try to get you. In this case, the King is Newt Gingrich, and he's still there. The Republican congressional majority will not be kindly disposed toward the unions. At a post-election forum last week organized by the Brookings Institution, retiring Rep. Steve Gunderson - a Wisconsin Republican, a moderate, and a man slow to anger - said that his fellow centrist Republicans are livid. The next Congress, he predicted, would do nothing to help unions and, where it had an option, would hurt them. Gunderson is no doubt right. The question is: What have the unions lost by doing what they did? Labor's campaign, whatever its failings, did change what the pollsters like to call the country's "issue agenda." The last thing one expected from the last Congress was an increase in the minimum wage. When the Democrats held the majority, at the beginning of President Bill Clinton's term, they didn't raise it. Clinton didn't do much about it then either. But labor's incessant advertising scared Republicans in working-class districts. Led by people such as Rep. Jack Quinn of New York - his district includes blue-collar South Buffalo - a large group of Republicans broke with the party leadership on the issue. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Costly Election for Labor Unions
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.