Attention Deficit Disorder Can Mean Creativity -- and Chaos Workers with Condition Struggle with Lateness, Forgetfulness

By 1996, Toledo Blade | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), November 17, 1996 | Go to article overview

Attention Deficit Disorder Can Mean Creativity -- and Chaos Workers with Condition Struggle with Lateness, Forgetfulness


1996, Toledo Blade, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Have you ever telephoned someone, been put on hold, and had the person you called never return to the line?

It might have been a technical malfunction. But perhaps the person who answered the phone was like Mary Jane Johnson or Jo Dee Robertson and had attention deficit disorder. They simply forgot you had ever called.

Johnson and Robertson don't make those mistakes anymore. But until they received treatment, their work and personal lives were chaotic, and they were convinced they were just stupid. The characteristics of ADD, sometimes termed attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, are well-known to elementary school teachers but are only slowly being recognized among adults. However, the disorder is among the disabilities employers can be r equired to make special accommodations for under the Americans with Disabilities Act, and other laws protecting the handicapped. The traits, similar to depression, are enough to make most employers cringe: habitual lateness, forgetfulness, procrastination, disorganization, messiness, difficulty planning and making decisions, impulsiveness, distractibility and a tendency to start but not finish projects. Some people have a strong tendency toward hyperactivity. Everyone experiences some of the attention deficit disorder's cluster of characteristics sometimes. But a diagnosis requires many of those traits to be more prevalent than normal, and long-lasting. That's not to say people with the disorder can't be successful; many are, particularly if they have chosen work in which they have an intense interest or talent, and an environment they can manipulate to accommodate their weak points. "One of the keys of career consulting is it's very important to find something to do that fascinates you, because attention is not under one's voluntary control," says Kathleen Nadeau, a Bethesda, Md., psychologist specializing in the disorder. People with the disorder often bring an abundance of energy to the job along with creativity, intelligence, vision, an ability to see the big picture and to think on their feet, Nadeau said. They can be gregarious "people persons." Nadeau figures one out of six or seven people in the United States may have the disorder, and as many as 5 percent of people are affected so severely that it interferes with their lives significantly.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Attention Deficit Disorder Can Mean Creativity -- and Chaos Workers with Condition Struggle with Lateness, Forgetfulness
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.