Embattled Personnel Review Bill Is Adopted Bateman Wins Objective as Longtime Foe Departs

By John Sonderegger Of The St. Charles Post | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), November 27, 1996 | Go to article overview

Embattled Personnel Review Bill Is Adopted Bateman Wins Objective as Longtime Foe Departs


John Sonderegger Of The St. Charles Post, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


St. Peters Alderman Judy Bateman pushed for two years to establish a Personnel Review Board, and finally her idea has been adopted in a bill approved by the Board of Aldermen.

One of her longtime adversaries on this issue was City Administrator Robert Irvin. He also could have been one of the Personnel Review Board's first customers.

The aldermen approved the Personnel Review Board Nov. 14, and in a closed session after that meeting Irvin either was fired by the mayor and the board or was forced to submit his resignation. Afterward, Bateman said Irvin turned to her and slyly said, "I promise not to go before your review board." Bateman, 2nd Ward, contends that Irvin resigned. Therefore, he would be ineligible to go before the new board because it deals only with involuntary terminations. Certainly, the case could be made that Irvin was involuntarily terminated from his position of 18 years. Alderman Joyce Townsend, 1st Ward, distributed copies of a bill that would have made it easier for the board to fire Irvin on the day before the closed session. But, Bateman says, Irvin was the only city employee working under a contract. That also would make him ineligible for a hearing before the new board. Irvin fought against this bill to the end. His position was that St. Peters already had a process by which employees with grievances could be heard. For a long time, Bateman could not get the necessary votes to pass her bill. Some, such as Alderman Jack Hunt, 3rd Ward, argued that having polit ical officials involved in personnel matters was not a good idea. Bateman countered that city employees were in an unfair situation. The ultimate judge after all hearings was the city administrator, the person who approved dismissals in the first place. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Embattled Personnel Review Bill Is Adopted Bateman Wins Objective as Longtime Foe Departs
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.