Haiti's Teachers Strike, Demand More Training Most Educators Didn't Go Past Sixth Grade

By Ap | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), January 12, 1997 | Go to article overview

Haiti's Teachers Strike, Demand More Training Most Educators Didn't Go Past Sixth Grade


Ap, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Haiti's 1,200 grade-school teachers took a test recently. Nearly all of them failed. Only 400 teachers could alphabetize a list of words.

Only 41 could arrange fractions by size. In other words, most didn't know that one-third is larger than one-sixth.

Additional training is one of several demands that public school teachers - including the ones who failed the test - are making in a five-day strike that started Thursday. It is the second strike this month. The state of education is one reason Haiti remains one of the poorest countries on earth. Most of the grade-school teachers flunked the Ministry of Education's test, because two-thirds of them have only a sixth-grade education. Under the current system, that's what qualifies them to teach up to grade six. Students reflect their teachers' ignorance. More than half of children ages 6 to 12 cannot read. Only 25 percent finish primary school. The average primary school graduate is 15 years old. Of the 75,000 students who make it to their senior year in high school, only 15 percent pass final exams to graduate, according to a November survey by UNICEF. For years, various governments have tried and failed to establish training criteria for teachers. President Rene Preval's government has ma de the same promise. He says schools will not hire new teachers without some form of training, at the government teacher training college, the Ecole Normale Superieure, or the University of Haiti. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Haiti's Teachers Strike, Demand More Training Most Educators Didn't Go Past Sixth Grade
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.