Gingrich May Get Reprimand, Fine Stiff Penalty for Violations Is Suggested

By 1997, Scripps Howard News Service | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), January 18, 1997 | Go to article overview

Gingrich May Get Reprimand, Fine Stiff Penalty for Violations Is Suggested


1997, Scripps Howard News Service, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


The ethics committee must vote on the suggested $3000,000 fine and formal punishment.

* * * *

The outside counsel hired to investigate ethics charges against House Speaker Newt Gingrich recommended Friday that the GOP leader be formally reprimanded by the House and penalized an unprecedented $300,000. There has never been a House speaker who has been reprimanded by the House. The highest fine ever paid by a member of Congress as a result of ethics violations was $124,000 by former Sen. Dave Durenberger, R-Minn., in 1990. The eight-member ethics committee, composed equally of Republicans and Democrats, was expected to vote late Friday to adopt counsel James Cole's recommendation for punishment. A vote by the House on a punishment is set for Tuesday. Rep. Dana Rohrabacker of California and several other GOP lawmakers - with the tacit backing of House Republican leaders - are organizing an effort to vote down a reprimand in favor of a milder "letter of reproval." A reprimand would not require Gingrich to step aside as speaker, unlike the more severe penalty of "censure." Cole said the seriousness of Gingrich's actions in the case merited a punishment "somewhere between reprimand and censure," and a decision was made in the committee to recommend a reprimand and a fine. Democratic lawmakers and aides said Cole had recommended to the commi ttee earlier this week that the evidence be referred to the Justice Department for investigation of possible criminal violations but that the recommendation was dropped under pressure from GOP committee members. Instead, the 213-page report by Cole recommends that the documents in the case be made available to the IRS. The IRS already is investigating. Rep. Steve Schiff, R-N.M., a member of the committee, denied there had ever been a recommendation for a referral to the Justice Department. Coming in the midst of one of the most bitterly partisan atmospheres lawmakers said they can remember, Cole's conclusions carry special weight because he is viewed as a neutral arbiter. "Over a number of years and in a number of situations, Mr. Gingrich showed a disregard and a lack of respect for the standards of conduct that applied to his activities," Cole said. Cole told the House ethics committee at a public hearing that Gingrich, a Republican from Georgia, took part in a scheme to finance partisan polit ical activities aimed at furthering his political ambitions and electing a Republican majority to Congress.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Gingrich May Get Reprimand, Fine Stiff Penalty for Violations Is Suggested
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.