'Mr. Patches' Enjoying Retirement Here

By Berger, Jerry | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), March 29, 1997 | Go to article overview

'Mr. Patches' Enjoying Retirement Here


Berger, Jerry, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Whatever became of Jack Miller, who appeared as Mr. Patches on Channel 30 in the early 1970s?

Margee Wheeler,

Manchester Jack Miller, 66, who portrayed Mr. Patches on Channel 11, Channel 4 and Channel 30 from 1960 to 1975, still lives in St. Louis. After his television career, he served as an account executive at the Waterbury Keim & Royal ad agency in Clayton. Then, before his retirement, he became a "history interpreter at the History Museum at the Gateway Arch, teaching kids American history and giving tours to visitors through the museum," he says. Miller is married to the former Claudia Stroup. He has two sons. Could you supply me with the history of Benton Park and the supposed caves underneath it? Also, why is there a statue of Friedrich Hecker in the park? Charles W. Rose, St. Louis Benton Park, one of the city's oldest, officially became a park by ordinance in 1866. The ordinance permitted the old city cemetery at that location to be made into a park to honor Thomas Hart Benton, the Missouri senator. There are 14 acres of play area at the corner of Arsenal and Jefferson on the South Side that includes walkways, a lagoon and green space. Facing Arsenal to the east is a more passive area with a lake. The third portion is the southern third of the park with three hillocks. On one is a granite obelisk in memory of Friedrich Hecker, a German revolutionary who immigrated to St. Louis and became a leader of the German-American community. Unfortunately, the bronze plaques with his portrait have been stolen by vandals. An elaborate monument to Benton once existed in Lafayette Park, but there is no sign referring to him in Benton Park. Any information you can give me on the St. Louis Mail Co. (circa 1921) would be appreciated. Chris Kenner, Catawissa, Mo. In the 1922 Gould's St. Louis Directory, there is a listing for a St. Louis Mail Order Co., but I can find no evidence of a St. Louis Mail Co. Is there still a Schiller Institute in St. Louis? Can you give me a brief history of it? …

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