High Court Asked to Rule on Religious Freedom Law

By Compiled From News Services | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), February 2, 1997 | Go to article overview

High Court Asked to Rule on Religious Freedom Law


Compiled From News Services, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


The Supreme Court was asked Wednesday to decide whether a 1993 federal law protecting religious freedom violated the constitutional separation of church and state.

The arguments came in a challenge to the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, a measure that President Bill Clinton strongly supported and signed.

The law prevents federal, state and local governments from restricting religious practices unless they can prove a "compelling interest" to justify their actions. Even then, they must adopt the least restrictive means possible. The city of Boerne, Texas, rejected a petition by St. Peter the Apostle Roman Catholic Church to expand its 74-year-old sanctuary on the grounds that the church is in a historic district. The town is near San Antonio. The archbishop sued, claiming denial of the construction permit violated the law, but the city said the law was unconstitutional. A federal judge struck down the law, but a U.S. appeals court upheld it, leading to an appeal to the Supreme Court. Arguing for the city, Marci Hamilton said the law shifted the balance of power between church and state in favor of religious groups. ***BEGIN THREE STAR TEXT*** "This case is not about religious freedom. This case is about federal power," she said. ***END THREE STAR TEXT*** Ohio State Solicitor Jeffrey Sutton also urged the court to strike down the law, saying, "It creates a new standard of review." He said the states, rather than Congress, should and would protect religious rights. But Douglas Laycock, arguing for the church, said the court should uphold the law. "Congress has always understood it has the right to protect constitutional rights." U.S. Solicitor General Walter Dellinger also supported the law, saying it was needed to protect the rights of minority religious groups that are often treated less favorably than more popular religions. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

High Court Asked to Rule on Religious Freedom Law
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.