Missouri Plans to Sue Makers of Cigarettes Consumer-Protection Laws Are Basis

By Kim Bell Post-Dispatch Jefferson City Bureau | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), April 24, 1997 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Missouri Plans to Sue Makers of Cigarettes Consumer-Protection Laws Are Basis


Kim Bell Post-Dispatch Jefferson City Bureau, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Missouri will file suit against leading tobacco companies, charging that they targeted children in ad campaigns and lied about the addictiveness of nicotine, Attorney General Jay Nixon announced Wednesday.

Nixon said the suit, to be filed in state court within a few weeks, will contend that the cigarette manufacturers violated Missouri's consumer-protection laws.

"For too long, there's been a pattern of misrepresentation, both in the amounts and addictive qualities of nicotine and on the marketing to kids," Nixon said. As the country's sentiment against tobacco companies intensifies, Nixon would become the 24th attorney general to follow Mississippi Attorney General Michael C. Moore, who filed suit in 1994. Nixon identified the company defendants as "the big five": Philip Morris Cos., RJR Nabisco, Liggett Group Inc., Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp. and American Tobacco Co. Inc. (The following text appeared in the Three Star Edition only:) Two of the leading companies did not respond to a reporter's questions Wednesday. (End of Three Star text) Philip Morris spokeswoman Patches Magarro said the company would not comment until the suit had been filed. RJR Nabisco could not be reached for comment. Nixon's announcement follows last week's disclosure that tobacco executives have been negotiating a settlement that could cost the industry hundreds of billions of dollars. "Previously, these major tobacco companies had refused even the possibility of settlement, and now there may be an opportunity to settle without protracted and expensive litigation," Nixon said. Missouri consumer-protection laws prohibit "deception, fraud, misrepresentation or suppression of any material fact" in connection with the sale or advertising of merchandise. "We can get $1,000 per violation, and I'm not sure how many packs of cigarettes they sold," Nixon said. "We now have proof that these companies have broken the laws of Missouri by willfully targeting young people and knowingly lying about the addictive nature of nicotine." The industry was rocked when Liggett executives this year admitted that smoking is addictive and turned over sensitive documents to states about the health risks and marketing to youth.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Missouri Plans to Sue Makers of Cigarettes Consumer-Protection Laws Are Basis
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?